Kohata Hata Matsuri (Kohata Flag Festival)

Kohata Hata Matsuri (Kohata Flag Festival)

The annual Kohata Hata Matsuri (Kohata Flag Festival) is 1 of the 3 main festivals in Japan centered on a dramatic procession of large flags, and has been held for over 960 years. The five hues of the brightly-colored flags rising up towards the sky makes for some fantastic views. Kohata Flag Festival, which has been designated as an Important Intangible Folk Cultural Property of Japan, is held annually on the first Sunday of December at Mt. Kohata. Mt. Kohata is home to the impressive Okitsushima Shrine.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.city.nihonmatsu.lg.jp/page/page002796.html
Best Season
  • Winter
Access Details
AccessMt. Kohata, Towa-machi, Nihonmatsu City
View directions
Getting there

By Train: From Nihonmatsu Station (on the JR Tohoku Main Line), take a bus heading for Kohata (木幡) for 45 min. Get off outside Kohata Daiichi Shogakko (木幡第一小学校), and from there walk 20 minutes.

By Car: 20 min drive from the Nihonmatsu I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway.

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