Futamata Onsen

Futamata Onsen

Outdoor hot spring baths line the sides of the valley at the foot of Mt. Futamata. The open-air baths of Futamata Onsen’s ryokan are situated in a very peaceful location, surrounded by ancient forests full of beech trees – all at an altitude of 800 m. Futamata Onsen’s hot spring baths have been used for about 1200 years, and are particularly revered for the hot spring water’s healing properties.

What’s more, being close to Ouch-juku, Futamata Onsen is conveniently located for a visit during your trip to Fukushima.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://ten-ei.net/index.aspx(Automated translation available)
Contact

Tenei Village Tourism Association

Best SeasonAll Year
Related infoSee below for the websites of two ryokan in Futamata Onsen.
Kashiwaya Ryokan: Website (Japanese)
Asunaro-so Ryokan: Website (Japanese)
Access Details
AccessTenei Village, Iwase District, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 40 min by car from Ouchi-juku; 70 min by car from Shirakawa Station.

By Bus: Reach the Futamata Onsen and Iwase Yumoto Onsen via the Yuttari-Yakon Bus, which leaves from Shirakawa Station (accessible from the JR Tohoku Shinkansen). This bus can be reserved at local hotels, ryokan or tourist information centers.

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple was built over 1000 years ago in a rocky cavern. The temple can be reached by taking paths lined with century-old Japanese cedar trees, and climbing a 130-step stone staircase. The cave that makes up part of the Yamamoto Fudoson temple grounds is where the Buddhist deity enshrined at this temple is worshipped. Yamamoto Fudoson Temple is located in Yamamoto Park. This park is centered in a valley – 5 km of which is designated as an Okukuji Prefectural Natural Park. A wonderful place for flower-viewing throughout the year, this area is also great for experiencing beautiful autumn leaves.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Hanamiyama

Hanamiyama Park is a privately-owned field for flowering and ornamental trees, in southeast Fukushima City.The park is located within a satoyama-type landscape i.e. managed woodland hill country close to human habitat. What originally began more than 60 years ago with local farmers planting flowers and trees, has grown into a beautiful scene. The landowner generously turned the area into a park in 1959 to allow visitors to enjoy the beautiful flowers there.Hanamiyama Park, and the wider Hanamiyama area, is now visited by thousands of admirers every year!Springtime visits see cherry, plum, and forsythia trees paint everything in vivid colors. A gentle pink and purple landscape waving in the breeze with the picturesque snow-capped Azuma Mountains in the distance makes for an amazing sight.The riot of spring colors is spectacular enough to merit calling this park Fukushima's very own paradise.The flowering landscape moves all who see it and has been preserved through the cooperation of the local residents. Enjoy a leisurely one-hour stroll that will take you from the foot of the hill to the summit. Travel through groves of flowering trees and other vibrant flowers in full bloom.Hanamiyama is the perfect getaway for a day for nature lovers, hikers, or people trying to escape for a short time.The best part is that spring isn’t the only beautiful time to visit. Marvel in wonder during the lush green summer foliage or the dappled colors of autumn. When you visit this fairytale-like wonderland, it is recommended that visitors wear comfortable walking shoes as the terrain includes graveled paths, steep slopes, and slippery areas. Mid- through late April is the peak season, so ready your camera and your heart for the beauty that awaits.

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

Kasumigajo Castle Park (Nihonmatsu Castle)

Nihonmatsu Castle was built in 1643 by Mitsushige Niwa, the first feudal lord of the Nihonmatsu Domain. This domain had command over a territory producing 100,000 koku of rice (one koku being the amount of rice needed to feed one man for a year) and Nihonmatsu Castle was one of the strategic points used by the Tokugawa Shogunate forces. The castle fell in Boshin War after a fierce battle, precipitating the tragedy of the Nihonmatsu Youth Corps. Today, the castle ruins have been turned into a prefectural natural park, with the stone walls being the only structures remaining from the old days. The seasonal beauty of the landscape with the restored castle and the surrounding natural environment is a soothing experience for visitors, particularly in the spring when the 1,700 cherry trees in the park are in full bloom, making it seem as if the castle is surrounded by haze of blossoms. This is why Nihonmatsu Castle is also referred to as "Kasumigajo" (meaning "castle in the mist"). In autumn, the park is crowded with visitors to Japan's largest chrysanthemum doll festival.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Kashi-Ohashi Bridge

Nishigo Village is truly blessed with breathtaking scenery and view spots, such as Kashi-Ohashi Bridge.Kashi-Ohashi Bridge stretches for 199 m against a backdrop of mountains, colored with fresh spring greenery or bright red leaves, depending on the season. Home to the water source of the Abukuma River, and filled with primeval forest trees, the beauty of Nishigo Village area was even praised by the feudal lord Matsudaira Sadanobu in centuries gone by. A bridle path has been constructed near Kashi-Ohashi Bridge, and lots of hikers come to visit every summer and autumn.

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