Mt. Iwatsuno

Mt. Iwatsuno

Mt. Iwatsuno is the name of a hill in Motomiya City which is populated with numerous temples, shrines, carvings, statues, caves, and other ancient things. Mt. Iwatsuno has long been known as a place for Shugendo and other religious training for Buddhist monks from the school of Tendai.

One of the most notable of Mt. Iwatsuno's temples is Gankakuji Temple, which was founded in 851. Other highlights include Okunoin, located at the top of Mt. Iwatsuno, which was built in the Kamakura Era, and Bisshamondo, which was rebuilt in the mid-19th century.

Mt. Iwatsuno can be explored on foot in around 1 hour, but visitors can easily spend longer if they want to explore all of the hidden treasures the hill has to offer.

It's possible for groups to do Zazen meditation on the hillside if visitors contact Mt. Iwatsuno in advance (bookings must be conducted in Japanese).

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.city.motomiya.lg.jp/site/kanko/miru.html(Automatic translation)
Contact

Mt. Iwatsuno

http://iwatsunosan.com/inquiry/

Best SeasonAll Year
Estimated Visit Time1h 15m
Opening Hours

Open all year

Entrance FeeFree to visit
Related info A festival is held at Mt. Iwatsuno during the new year holidays.
Access Details
AccessHigashiyaguchi 84, Wada, Motomiya City, Fukushima Pref. 969-1205
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 15 min drive from the Motomiya I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway.

By Train: 15 min by taxi from Motomiya Sta. (JR Tohoku Main Line).

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