Nakano Fudoson Temple

Nakano Fudoson Temple

Nakano Fudoson is a Zen Buddhist temple built around a waterfall. Nakano Fudoson Temple is dedicated to the Buddhist deity Acala (Fudo in Japanese), one of the Buddhist ‘Kings of Knowledge’. Three forms of this deity can be praised at different areas within this temple.

Those hoping to ward off evil & bad luck can worship the deity at the main temple. Those looking to protect their eyesight in the coming year can pray at the Kitoden. Those wanting to worship the Fudo deity even more intimately can do so at the Okunoin cave complex, which contains 36 Buddhist statues.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://nakanofudouson.jp/en/#visitorguide
Contact

Fukushima City Tourism & Conventions Association

(+81) 24-563-5554

fukushima.guide@f-kankou.jp

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

8:30 AM - 5:00 PM (Closes at 4:00 PM from mid-Oct. to Dec.)

Open all year

ParkingFree parking
Entrance FeeFree
Access Details
AccessSekizaka 28, Iizaka-machi, Nakano, Fukushima City, Fukushima Pref. 960-0261
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min from the Iizaka I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

By Train: 8 min taxi (or 5 km cycle) from Iizaka Onsen Station (Fukushima Kotsu Iizaka Line)

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