Natsui Senbon-Zakura

Natsui Senbon-Zakura

There are 1,000 Yoshino cherry blossom trees planted along both sides of the Natsui River, giving the area the name of 'Natsui Senbon-Zakura', which translates as 'Natsui's 1000 cherry trees'. The view of the river stretching out in the distance is calming. The cherry blossoms actually line the river for a distance of 5 km.
Natsui Senbon-Zakura offers good spots for taking pictures. Take a walk along the promenade near the banks of the Natsui River for some beautiful shots of the contrast between the glistening river and the cherry blossoms.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://onokankou.jimdofree.com/%E8%A6%B3%E5%85%89-%E8%87%AA%E7%84%B6/(Japanese)
Contact

Ono Town Tourism Association

(+81) 247-72-6938

kankou@town.ono.fukushima.jp

Best Season
  • Spring
ParkingAvailable (Space for 400 vehicles available) 500 yen per vehicle
Entrance FeeFree
Access Details
AccessNatsui, Ono Town, Tamura District, Fukushima Pref. 963-3312
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min drive from Ono I.C. exit off the Joban Expressway

By Train: 5 min walk from Natsui Station on the JR Ban-etsu East Line

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