Abukuma Cave

Abukuma Cave

A world of mystical beauty created over millions of years, Abukuma Cave is said to have the greatest variety and the largest number of stalactites in the whole of Asia. It takes about an hour to explore the inner world of the cave and the terrain is easy to navigate on foot.

Abukuma Cave is a limestone cave that was discovered in 1969. Inside, visitors can walk the 600-meter-long path to explore and view the beautiful cave formations. Visitors can’t help but be impressed by the beauty of these natural creations formed over the course of 80 million years. The largest hall in the cave, called Takine Goten (Takine Hall), and Tsuki no Sekai (The Moon World), is illuminated with dramatic stage lighting and is particularly impressive.

Also not to be missed are the rare cave formations called boxwork, you can identify them by their unique shape; thin blades of minerals coming off the walls and ceilings forming a honeycomb or box-like pattern. Abukuma Cave is the only cave in Japan with boxwork that is open to the public. Another notable stop along the cave path is the Christmas Tree and Silver Frost; both are impressive stalagmites that resemble festive holiday trees. The Christmas Tree is over two meters tall and said to be the largest example in all of Asia.

There is an additional thrilling adventure course; experience crawling through narrow passages and climbing a ladder to spectacular views over the cave! This 120-meter-long course runs parallel to the main passage, but please note that visitors may have to crawl on their hands and knees at times.

When you have finished exploring the mysterious depths and come back to the surface you can find plenty of restaurants and souvenir shops. Visit in mid-June to July to see the neighbouring hillside covered in 50,000 lavender plants.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://abukumado.com/en/
Contact

Abukuma Cave Administration Office

(+81) 247-78-2125

info@abukumado.com

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

Apr. 1 – Jun. 20: 8:30am – 5:00pm | Jun. 21 – Sep. 30: 8:30am – 5:30pm | Oct. 1 – Nov. 20: 8:30am – 5:00pm | Nov. 21 – Mar. 13: 8:30am – 4:30pm | Mar. 14 – Mar. 31: 8:30am – 5:00pm

ParkingFree
Entrance FeeAdults: 1,200 yen
13 - 15 years old: 800 yen
7 - 12 years old: 600 yen
Adventure course is available for an extra 200 yen.
Access Details
Access1 Higashikamayama, Sugaya, Takine-Machi, Tamura City, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 20 min from Ono I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway. After exiting the Ban-etsu Expressway, take Route 349, then Prefectural Route 36, before passing onto Prefectural Route 19. Then turn right after 7-Eleven.

By Train: Approx. 10 min from Kanmata Station on the Ban-etsu East Line.
 

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