Kasumigajo Castle Park (Nihonmatsu Castle)

Kasumigajo Castle Park (Nihonmatsu Castle)

Nihonmatsu Castle was built in 1643 by Mitsushige Niwa, the first feudal lord of the Nihonmatsu Domain. This domain had command over a territory producing 100,000 koku of rice (one koku being the amount of rice needed to feed one man for a year) and Nihonmatsu Castle was one of the strategic points used by the Tokugawa Shogunate forces. The castle fell in Boshin War after a fierce battle, precipitating the tragedy of the Nihonmatsu Youth Corps.

Today, the castle ruins have been turned into a prefectural natural park, with the stone walls being the only structures remaining from the old days. The seasonal beauty of the landscape with the restored castle and the surrounding natural environment is a soothing experience for visitors, particularly in the spring when the 1,700 cherry trees in the park are in full bloom, making it seem as if the castle is surrounded by haze of blossoms. This is why Nihonmatsu Castle is also referred to as "Kasumigajo" (meaning "castle in the mist").

In autumn, the park is crowded with visitors to Japan's largest chrysanthemum doll festival.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.city.nihonmatsu.lg.jp/page/page002702.html
Contact

Nihonmatsu Tourism Federation

(+81) 243-55-5122

info@nihonmatsu-kanko.jp

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

Open all year round.

ParkingAvailable (Space for 500 vehicles)
Related infoBest time to see cherry blossoms: Mid April It is free to enter the Castle Park for most of the year, but there is an entrance fee during the Chrysanthemum Doll Festival every autumn.
Accommodation details

Pets: Allowed

Access Details
Access232 3-Choume, Kakunai, Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Pref. 964-0904
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 5 min from Nihonmatsu I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

By Train: 20 min walk from Nihonmatsu Station on the JR Tohoku Main Line

Related trips

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Bandai-Azuma Skyline

This sightseeing road that runs from Fukushima City's Takayu Onsen to the Tsuchiyu Pass, commanding panoramic views of the surrounding landscape. The spectacular views that stretch out at an average altitude of 1,350 meters attract visitors time and time again, and Bandai-Azuma Skyline has been selected as one of the 100 Best Roads in Japan. In spring, tourists can enjoy flower viewing while at the same time taking in the otherworldly winter scenery of the "Snow Corridor". In summer, the Nemoto Shakunage (Rhododendron brachycarpum), a species of alpine rose, and other alpine plants display their colorful flowers and fresh, brilliant green leaves. During autumn, the drive warms as roads become enclosed by fiery seasonal leaves. There are also many hot springs in the vicinity of the Skyline where visitors can enjoy a bath and relax stiff muscles while out on a daytrip. The roadway passes next to the crater of Mt. Azuma-Kofuji. Visitors can easily park their car at the nearby guest center and enjoy a short hike up to the crater’s rim. The Bandai-Azuma Skyline Roadway has been selected as one of the top 100 roads in Japan, and unlike many others, this one is free to use. There are rest stops along the way for the hungry traveler; the most popular is Jododaira, as it’s home to a rest house and an observatory. Be sure to plan ahead though, from mid-November to early April the roadway is closed due to heavy winter snowfall.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Kashi-Ohashi Bridge

Nishigo Village is truly blessed with breathtaking scenery and view spots, such as Kashi-Ohashi Bridge. Kashi-Ohashi Bridge stretches for 199 m against a backdrop of mountains, colored with fresh spring greenery or bright red leaves, depending on the season. Home to the water source of the Abukuma River, and filled with primeval forest trees, the beauty of Nishigo Village area was even praised by the feudal lord Matsudaira Sadanobu in centuries gone by. A bridle path has been constructed near Kashi-Ohashi Bridge, and lots of hikers come to visit every summer and autumn.

You might also like

Ryusenji Temple
Historical Sites

Ryusenji Temple

Ryusenji Temple is the perfect place to refresh the mind and body during your trip to Fukushima Prefecture. Originally built in 1320, the temple underwent many name changes until being called Ryusenji. The beautiful main hall has not changed for about 300 years after being reconstructed due to a fire in 1758. Nowadays, the temple offers many interesting events and vistas to visitors. There are many sights to experience at Ryusenji. Inside the main hall of the temple, you can see a cloth bag containing the temple’s treasures and a palanquin-shaped box hanging from the ceiling. This important Cultural Property also contains many wooden statues and make for an impressive time amongst history. If you would like a more personal experience at Ryusenji Temple, why not try the Zazen meditation experience offered by the temple’s monks? Zazen is a short zen meditation experience and is offered at Ryusenji Temple on the first Sunday of every month, as well as the first and third Wednesdays of every month. Sit in silence and stillness for 20 minutes while you empty yourself of worldly thoughts and desires. It’s best to contact ahead of time to make reservations if you’d like to experience their Zazen, temple yoga, or calligraphy. The nature surrounding Ryusenji Temple and the calming halls of the temple will welcome you and give you peace of mind and spirit. So shed the busy angst of your life and let Ryusenji Temple offer you a serene experience.

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple
Historical Sites

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple was built over 1000 years ago in a rocky cavern. The temple can be reached by taking paths lined with century-old Japanese cedar trees, and climbing a 130-step stone staircase. The cave that makes up part of the Yamamoto Fudoson temple grounds is where the Buddhist deity enshrined at this temple is worshipped. Yamamoto Fudoson Temple is located in Yamamoto Park. This park is centered in a valley – 5 km of which is designated as an Okukuji Prefectural Natural Park. A wonderful place for flower-viewing throughout the year, this area is also great for experiencing beautiful autumn leaves.

Mt. Iwatsuno
Historical Sites

Mt. Iwatsuno

Mt. Iwatsuno is the name of a hill in Motomiya City which is populated with numerous temples, shrines, carvings, statues, caves, and other ancient things. Mt. Iwatsuno has long been known as a place for Shugendo and other religious training for Buddhist monks from the school of Tendai. One of the most notable of Mt. Iwatsuno's temples is Gankakuji Temple, which was founded in 851. Other highlights include Okunoin, located at the top of Mt. Iwatsuno, which was built in the Kamakura Era, and Bisshamondo, which was rebuilt in the mid-19th century. Mt. Iwatsuno can be explored on foot in around 1 hour, but visitors can easily spend longer if they want to explore all of the hidden treasures the hill has to offer. It's possible for groups to do Zazen meditation on the hillside if visitors contact Mt. Iwatsuno in advance (bookings must be conducted in Japanese).

Okitsushima Shrine
Historical Sites

Okitsushima Shrine

Off the beaten track, Mt. Kohata’s Okitsushima Shrine is a perfect spot for those searching for a peaceful, spiritual place to visit. The shrine’s story – Date Masamune burned down Mt. Kohata in order to dominate the area during the Tensho Era (1563-1593), but couldn’t destroy the shrine’s three-storied pagoda – makes the area even more special. The three main goddesses of Shintoism – whose names are Princess Tagori, Princess Tagitsu, Princess Ichikishima – are worshipped at this shrine. These three goddesses are thought to be the daughters of the sun goddess Amaterasu, the major deity in the Shinto religion. It is not only Shintoism which is practiced at this shrine, but also Buddhism. In particular, the Japanese Buddhist goddess known as ‘Benten sama’ is worshipped on Mt. Kohata. Despite the turmoil which engulfed faith in Buddhism which occurred during the Meiji Era, strong faith in Benten sama – the Buddhist deity of peace, good luck, wisdom, and marriage – continues to this very day. Kohata Flag Festival, which has been designated as an Important Intangible Folk Cultural Property of Japan, is held annually on the first Sunday of December at Mt. Kohata.

Top