Oyakuen Garden

Oyakuen Garden

Oyakuen was used approximately 600 years ago as a villa for the then lord of the Aizu Domain. Subsequently, in the mid-17th century, the lord of the Aizu Domain started growing medicinal herbs within the grounds which he developed to protect the citizenry from epidemics. This lead to the garden gaining the name "Oyakuen", which literally means "medicinal garden."

The traditional garden has been preserved as it was long ago, and Oyakuen has now been designated as an important national asset. The buildings within the grounds were used by the lord as a place of relaxation and for entertainment. Accordingly, Oyakuen still contains buildings devoted to Japanese tea. Visitors can enjoy a cup of herbal tea here even today.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://aizuwakamatsu.mylocal.jp/en/trip/spot-list/-/spotdetail/spotinfo/1000000066/3999496
Contact

Oyakuen Garden

(+81) 242-27-2472

info@tsurugajo.com

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

8:30 AM - 5:00 PM (Last entrance at 4:30 PM)

Open all year

ParkingFree (61 cars)
Entrance FeeAdults: 330 yen
High school students: 270 yen
Junior high and elementary school students: 160 yen
Related infoEnjoy seasonal views of Oyakuen Garden throughout the year.
Recommended photo spot: The view of the garden from the tea house
Access Details
Access8-1 Hanaharumachi, Aizu-Wakamatsu City, Fukushima Pref. 965-0804
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 15 min drive from the Aizu-Wakamatsu I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Bus: Take the Haikara-san or Akabe sightseeing loop bus from Aizuwakamatsu Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line) and get off at Oyakuen Bus Stop. From there, walk for 3 min. The gardens are a 15 min walk from Tsurugajo Castle

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