Takashiba Dekoyashiki (Takashiba Craft Village)

Takashiba Dekoyashiki (Takashiba Craft Village)

A traditional craftsmen's village bestowing an air of the olde-worlde. The papier-mâché crafts of the town, made lovingly by hand for generations, will bring a smile to your face.

Takashiba Dekoyashiki is an historical craftsmen's village, and was at one time under the protection of the Miharu feudal domain. Dating back 300 years to the Edo Period, this community is said to have been born when a traveller from Kyoto taught the people how to craft papier-mâché dolls using a special paint called 'nikawa'. Take a walk through the nikawa-scented streets of Takashiba Dekoyashiki and step into the Japan of old. Visitors can try their hand at painting various traditional crafts, including the Miharu-koma horse wooden doll.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.kanko-koriyama.gr.jp/tourism/detail3-0-66.html(Automated translation available)
Contact

Koriyama City Tourism Association

(+81) 24-924-2621

info@kanko-koriyama.gr.jp

Best SeasonAll Year
ParkingAvailable (Approx. 100 cars)
Entrance FeeEntrance is free. There are charges for the various painting experiences.
Access Details
AccessNishita-machi, Takashiba District, Koriyama City, Fukushima Pref. 963-0902
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min from Koriyama-Higashi I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 10 min taxi ride from Miharu Station on the JR Ban-etsu East Line

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