Licca Castle

Licca Castle

Licca Castle houses a production studio and museum both dedicated to Licca dolls (Japanese fashion dolls). In this building designed in the image of a European castle, you can find out everything there is to know about the five generations of Licca dolls.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.jetro.go.jp/en/ind_tourism/licca_castle.html
Contact

Licca Castle

(+81) 247-72-6364

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

Hours: 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM (Last admission: 3:30 PM)

Closed Mondays (Check website for other special closures)

ParkingAvailable (Free, up to 100 cars)
Accommodation details

Pets: Not allowed

Related info<u>Admission Fees</u>

Adult (High school student or above): 800 yen

Children (2 years of age or above): 600 yen

Free for kids under 2 years of age
Access Details
Access51-3 Nakadori, Ono Nii-machi, Ono Town, Fukushima Pref. 963-3401
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 5 min drive from Ono I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 10 min walk from Ono Shinmachi Sta. on the JR Ban-etsu East Line

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