Yamamoto Fudoson Temple

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple was built over 1000 years ago in a rocky cavern. The temple can be reached by taking paths lined with century-old Japanese cedar trees, and climbing a 130-step stone staircase. The cave that makes up part of the Yamamoto Fudoson temple grounds is where the Buddhist deity enshrined at this temple is worshipped.

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple is located in Yamamoto Park. This park is centered in a valley – 5 km of which is designated as an Okukuji Prefectural Natural Park. A wonderful place for flower-viewing throughout the year, this area is also great for experiencing beautiful autumn leaves.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.yamamotofudouson.or.jp/(Japanese)
Best SeasonAll Year
ParkingAvailable
Entrance FeeFree
Related infoBest time to visit to see autumn leaves: Late Oct. to early Nov.
Access Details
AccessKohizawa 94-2, Kitayamamoto, Tanagura Town, Higashi-Shirakawa, Fukushima Pref. 963-5685
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 40 min from the Yabuki-chuo I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

By Train: 8 min by taxi from JR Chikatsu Station (JR Suigun Line)

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