Yamamoto Fudoson Temple

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple was built over 1000 years ago in a rocky cavern. The temple can be reached by taking paths lined with century-old Japanese cedar trees, and climbing a 130-step stone staircase. The cave that makes up part of the Yamamoto Fudoson temple grounds is where the Buddhist deity enshrined at this temple is worshipped.

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple is located in Yamamoto Park. This park is centered in a valley – 5 km of which is designated as an Okukuji Prefectural Natural Park. A wonderful place for flower-viewing throughout the year, this area is also great for experiencing beautiful autumn leaves.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.yamamotofudouson.or.jp/(Japanese)
Best SeasonAll Year
ParkingAvailable
Entrance FeeFree
Related infoBest time to visit to see autumn leaves: Late Oct. to early Nov.
Access Details
AccessKohizawa 94-2, Kitayamamoto, Tanagura Town, Higashi-Shirakawa, Fukushima Pref. 963-5685
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 40 min from the Yabuki-chuo I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

By Train: 8 min by taxi from JR Chikatsu Station (JR Suigun Line)

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This sightseeing road that runs from Fukushima City's Takayu Onsen to the Tsuchiyu Pass, commanding panoramic views of the surrounding landscape. The spectacular views that stretch out at an average altitude of 1,350 meters attract visitors time and time again, and Bandai-Azuma Skyline has been selected as one of the 100 Best Roads in Japan. In spring, tourists can enjoy flower viewing while at the same time taking in the otherworldly winter scenery of the "Snow Corridor". In summer, the Nemoto Shakunage (Rhododendron brachycarpum), a species of alpine rose, and other alpine plants display their colorful flowers and fresh, brilliant green leaves. During autumn, the drive warms as roads become enclosed by fiery seasonal leaves. There are also many hot springs in the vicinity of the Skyline where visitors can enjoy a bath and relax stiff muscles while out on a daytrip. The roadway passes next to the crater of Mt. Azuma-Kofuji. Visitors can easily park their car at the nearby guest center and enjoy a short hike up to the crater’s rim. The Bandai-Azuma Skyline Roadway has been selected as one of the top 100 roads in Japan, and unlike many others, this one is free to use. There are rest stops along the way for the hungry traveler; the most popular is Jododaira, as it’s home to a rest house and an observatory. Be sure to plan ahead though, from mid-November to early April the roadway is closed due to heavy winter snowfall.

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