Tsurugajo Kaikan

Tsurugajo Kaikan

Tsurugajo Kaikan is a shopping complex next to Tsurugajo Castle.

Here you can try local cuisine, from Wappa Meshi and Sauce Katsudon, to soba noodles and Kitakata Ramen.
The French restaurant "Racines" is also on the premises, so that both Japanese and western-style cuisines can be enjoyed in one location. The restaurants have seating for approximately 1,000 guests.

The first floor contains a tax-free shop that sells local Aizu goods and souvenirs, from ready-to-cook Kitakata Ramen, soba noodles, Japanese pickles, and sweet treats, to traditional crafts like Akabeko lucky red cow.

You can even try painting your own Akabeko cow (a traditional folk toy which is said to bring luck), and take it home as a souvenir of your trip. Painting an Akabeko takes about 30 minutes, and a reservation is required for groups.

The parking area accommodates full-size buses as well as personal vehicles.
 

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://tsurukan.com/(Japanese)
Contact

Tsurugajo Kaikan

(+81) 242-28-2288

turugajoukaikan@aizu-edoya.co.jp

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM (In Winter, Tsurugajo Kaikan closes at 4:00 PM) Open daily year-round

Open daily year-round

ParkingParking is available for up to 200 cars and 50 full-size buses (free for restaurant and store customers).
Access Details
Access4-47 Oite-machi, Aizu-Wakamatsu City, Fukushima Pref. 965-0873
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 15 min drive from the Aizuwakamatsu I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Bus: Easily accessible from Aizu-Wakamatsu Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line) via the sightseeing loop bus. The bus takes around 15 min. The nearest stops on the "Haikara-san" loop bus route are Tsurugajo Kita-guchi (鶴ヶ城北口) and San-no-Maru (三ノ丸) .

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