Yanaizu Onsen

Yanaizu Onsen

Yanaizu is a rural temple town that has flourished thanks to the renowned Enzoji Temple. Many lodges were built in Yanaizu Town for travelers taking part in temple pilgrims. Many of these lodges have been repurposed as onsen ryokan inns. Yanaizu Town is now the largest onsen town on the Tadami River. Visitors come from far and wide to be enchanted by the fine river mists found on the Tadami River in the early summer, and the brilliantly-colored leaves in the autumn.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.yanaidu.com/onsen/onsen.html(Japanese)
Contact

Yanaizu Tourism Association

(+81) 241-42-2346

Best SeasonAll Year
Related infoSee here for an English information pamphlet made by Yanaizu Town.
Access Details
AccessYanaizu Town, Kawanuma District, Fukushima Pref. 969-7201
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min by car from the Aizu-bange I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 15 min walk from Aizu Yanaizu Station on the JR Tadami Line

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Shopping & Souvenirs

Honke Kanouya

Among the simple color palette of Ouchi-juku, Honke Kanouya will draw your eyes with their brightly-colored collection of goods. Lining the store front is a wide assortment of items like vegetable-shaped beanbags to ornaments to decorations to fabric accessories. All these crafts are handmade. The eye-catching goods make great souvenirs for family and friends alike! Recommended items include the Aizu-made fabric accessories and selected seasonal vegetables beanbags.  

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Isasumi Shrine

Aizu Misato Town’s historic Isasumi Shrine, known as a great spot for viewing beautiful irises, holds a festival to celebrate the splendor of these flowers every year. Isasumi Shrine's history is thought to be connected to how the Aizu region got its name - a story that has been recorded in two of Japan’s most legendary books of folklore. According to the tale, around 2000 years ago, four shogun were entrusted with uniting the four areas of land which would become Japan. Two of these shogun happened to be father and son. One was sent to the north-east, and the other to the north-west. When the father and son had completed their work uniting the towns in their respective areas, they met in the middle. They named the area “Aizu” (会津), which can be translated as “The riverbank (津) where we met (会)”. The father and son travelled to Mt. Mikagura-dake, a mountain that borders Niigata Prefecture and Aizu, and prayed to the shinto god of pioneering new lands to protect Aizu, and the rest of Japan. Isasumi Shrine is thought to be built where they met. In spring, the shrine grounds become decorated with the blossoms of one of the most prized cherry trees in Aizu. It is said that this tree, which is named Usuzumi Sakura (“Diluted-Ink Sakura”), has been the sacred tree of Isasumi Shrine since it was brought down from Mt. Mikagura-dake and planted in the shrine grounds as a way of commemorating the efforts of the father and son. The lovely, light scent of the cherry blossom welcomes visitors each spring.

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Oze Hinoemata Onsen
Hot Springs

Oze Hinoemata Onsen

Oze Hinoemata Onsen has hot springs fed to every household, as well as bathing facilities run by the village for day visits. Aruza Oze no Sato, Hiuchi no Yu, Koma no Yu are all names of hot spring establishments in the town. Hinoemata area is also famous for Kabuki, a form of traditional performing art in Japan. Traditional Kabuki performances with a rich history dating from the Edo Period are still performed to this day on Hinoemata's kabuki stage, which is over 250 years old. There are three performances per year (May 12, August 18, and the first Saturday of September). Explore historical and cultural treasures such as the kabuki stage, the unique shrine featuring a stone statue of Hashiba-no-Banba, itakura (wooden storehouses), the six jizo statues, and the Hinoemata Folk Village by foot. Make sure to try Hinoemata area's 'Yamodo Cuisine': a characteristic cuisine centered on 100% buckwheat noodles, which features dishes such as 'Hatto soba' and rice cakes. Visitors can also enjoy walking and fishing at Hinoemata Mini Oze Park, a spacious park which comes to life with bright colours throughout the year as various flowers take turns to bloom. Oze Hinoemata Onsen is at the gateway to Oze National Park, making it as a base for hiking around Ozegahara Marsh, and for climbing mountains such as Mt. Hiuchigatake, Aizu Komagatake, Teishakuzen, and Tashiroyama.

Yunokami Onsen
Hot Springs

Yunokami Onsen

Yunokami Onsen is famous for having one of the only thatched roof station buildings in Japan. The hot spring area is fed from 8 source springs. Each ryokan (traditional Japanese inn) in the town draws its hot water directly from the source. The clear, transparent water is beloved for being soft and gentle on the skin. Many lodges offer just day-use of their baths, making it a great place to enjoy on a whim. There is also a public foot bath located at Yunokami Onsen Station. During the cherry blossom season, visitors can enjoy a warm foot bath while watching the light pink petals fluttering in the wind.

Atsushio Onsen
Hot Springs

Atsushio Onsen

Atsushio Onsen – which means ‘Hot Salt Onsen’ – gets its name because of the high salt content and hot temperature of its source water (70 degrees). For generations, this onsen has been hailed by local people as having healing properties. Also known as ‘Kodomo Takara no Yu’ (‘The Sanctity of Children Onsen’), Atsushio Onsen is home to a Buddhist statue dedicated to the act of raising children. Here you often see mothers paying their respects to deities after their wishes have been realized.

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