Yunokami Onsen

Yunokami Onsen

Yunokami Onsen is famous for having one of the only thatched roof station buildings in Japan. The hot spring area is fed from 8 source springs. Each ryokan (traditional Japanese inn) in the town draws its hot water directly from the source. The clear, transparent water is beloved for being soft and gentle on the skin.

Many lodges offer just day-use of their baths, making it a great place to enjoy on a whim. There is also a public foot bath located at Yunokami Onsen Station. During the cherry blossom season, visitors can enjoy a warm foot bath while watching the light pink petals fluttering in the wind.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.yunokami.com/(Automated translation available)
Contact

Yunokami Onsen Tourism Association (+81) 241-68-2818

(+81) 241-68-2818

Best SeasonAll Year
Related infoCheck out Yunokami Onsen Tourism Association's website for information on which inns have open-air baths and/or reservable private baths.
Access Details
AccessYunokami, Shimogo Town, Minamiaizu District, Fukushima Pref. 969-5206
View directions
Getting there

By Car:

  • 50 min by car from the Aizuwakamatsu I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway
  • 15 min by car from Ouchi-juku

By Train:

  • Get off at Yunokami Onsen Station (Aizu Railway Line). It takes 1 hour to arrive at Yunokami Onsen Station from Aizuwakamatsu Station

Related trips

  1. Nature

    Onsen & Sightseeing in Aizu by Train

    Jump start your vacation in Fukushima’s Aizu region with this multi-day tour, which can be enjoyed at any time of year. These ideas make for great additions to already existing plans, or as a tour of their own. No matter how you decide to use this itinerary, you won’t be disappointed. Travel by train and local bus, or taxi, to enjoy Aizu to the fullest. Begin your adventure at Aizu-Wakamatsu Station (don’t forget to snap some pics of its bowing red akabeko cow out front) and use the local bus or taxi to make your way for Tsurugajo Castle. Walk through the gardens and grounds of this magnificent castle and marvel at the red-tile roof—the only one of its kind in all of Japan. Inside you can tour the castle keep and see the artifacts of Aizu, let history come to life before your eyes. From the castle, travel to Nanokamachi-dori Street; this quaint area has preserved its early-20th century architecture and is now home to souvenir boutiques and many diners and hidden gems. With that being enough for one day’s excitement, head over to Higashiyama Onsen and soak your travel aches away in the hot springs of Harataki ryokan, which even has its own hot spring source. You’ll love taking a dip in these hot, refreshing, and soothing waters—the outside open-air bath is especially recommended. The next day, why not head over to Ouchi-juku, here you can tour an authentic preserved Aizu village and try local cuisine. The whole area gets really busy in winter and, if you’re brave enough to face the cold, the snow festival is a popular event.  

    Onsen & Sightseeing in Aizu by Train

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Oyakuen Garden

Oyakuen was used approximately 600 years ago as a villa for the then lord of the Aizu Domain. Subsequently, in the mid-17th century, the lord of the Aizu Domain started growing medicinal herbs within the grounds which he developed to protect the citizenry from epidemics. This lead to the garden gaining the name "Oyakuen", which literally means "medicinal garden." The traditional garden has been preserved as it was long ago, and Oyakuen has now been designated as an important national asset. The buildings within the grounds were used by the lord as a place of relaxation and for entertainment. Accordingly, Oyakuen still contains buildings devoted to Japanese tea. Visitors can enjoy a cup of herbal tea here even today.

The World Glassware Hall
Museums & Galleries

Hideo Noguchi Memorial Museum

Most people probably don’t know who Hideo Noguchi (1876-1928) is by name but just look at a 1,000-yen note and you’ll know his face. A renowned bacteriologist, Noguchi made great advances in the research of a vaccine for yellow fever. He’s also credited with the discovery of the agent which causes syphilis. This memorial museum was established to honor the Nobel-nominated bacteriologist, and to introduce his life achievements. The house where Noguchi was born stands within the museum grounds. Visitors to the house can see the fireplace where he fell as a child, leading to him seriously burning his left hand. The alcove post of the house has carved into it the words of resolution Noguchi made before he went to Tokyo. The exhibition room contains many resources that introduce Noguchi's life and accomplishments, including his favorite articles, letters, and photographs. In Noguchi's laboratory, which was recreated for the memorial museum, visitors can interact with a robot designed in the image of Noguchi. The robot answers questions from visitors and gives them encouraging messages. Though the house retains its Meiji Period charm, the hall and facilities were renovated in April 2015, during which time the experience-based corner was added. Here, guests can learn about bacteriology through videos and interactive games. Aizu-Ichiban Café, a café which renovated from the clinic where Hideo Noguchi received treatment for the burns he suffered to his left hand, is located nearby. Once named Kaihiyo Clinic, this is where he spent much of his youth and acquired his motivation to study and ambition to help others. There are also a number of his belongings on display, making it an interesting place to visit after a trip to the museum.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Goshiki-numa Ponds

The Goshiki-numa ponds of Urabandai are a cluster of five volcanic lakes at the foot of Mt. Bandai. When Mt. Bandai erupted in 1888, Goshiki-numa - which translates as "Five-Colored Ponds - were formed. In actuality dozens of lakes were created due to the 1888 eruption, but the Goshiki-numa Ponds are the most famous. It was thanks to the eruption that the lakes each took on rich color; the various minerals found in each lake give them a unique color and create a mystical aura. The colors of the Goshiki-numa Ponds also change throughout the year depending on weather and time of day, a truly mysterious phenomenon. The lakes have become a popular tourist destination. The five main lakes are Bishamon, Aka, Ao, Benten, and Midoro, and their colors range from a lime green to deep turquoise to a topaz blue. A scenic walking route guides visitors around the ponds. At 3.6 km in length, this walking route - which will take you past many of the ethereal colors - takes about 70 minutes to complete. If you’d like a view of all five lakes at once, why not take the 4 km walking trail from Bishamon-numa (largest of the five lakes) up to nearby Lake Hibara. Alternatively, if hiking is not on your itinerary, enjoy a simple rowboat out on Bishamon-numa. It’s especially lovely in autumn as the color of the autumn leaves reflects on the deep green surface of the lake. In winter, there are even snowshoe trekking tours offered. The color of the lakes looks particularly vivid in winter, seeing as the minerals in some of the lakes stop them from freezing over, meaning you can see their colors contrasted with the white of the snow. Be sure to stop by the Urabandai Visitor Center, which is a large and well-equipped facility. You can find great information here about tours as well as the various geography, wildlife, and even the history of the area. It’s a great chance to learn more about the ecosystem that makes up the Goshiki-numa Ponds.

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Established over 1,300 years ago, Higashiyama Onsen is a well-known retreat area in Aizu-Wakamatsu City. The recognized historical onsen town is said to have been founded by the Buddhist priest Gyōki. According to legend, he found the area by following a bird with three legs, an auspicious and mystical omen. The area was popular with people from all over Aizu during the Edo Period and was developed as a retreat area. Today it is listed among the top three onsen towns of old Tohoku. Being only 10 minutes by car from the heart of Aizu-Wakamatsu City, visitors are sure to enjoy their time at Higashiyama Onsen. The traditional Japanese ryokan (inns) of Higashiyama Onsen line both sides of the Yukawa River, giving the area a picturesque air. Let your mind and body relax in the warm sodium-sulphate waters and clean, crisp air. A visit in autumn treats ryokan and hotel guests to the fantastic experience of bathing in a hot springs while viewing autumn leaves. The ryokan in the area are a mix of modern and traditional, perfect to suit any taste. For sightseeing, there are plenty of shops and restaurants in the area for you to enjoy local goods and cuisine. Moreover, staying in Higashiyama Onsen is a great option for those who would like to sightsee in Aizu-Wakamatsu. Higashiyama Onsen is also home to geigi (geisha), whose traditions have been passed down through the generations. If you make a reservation, you can watch them perform. These classically trained entertainers are skilled in song, dance, and music. Their breathtaking performances reflect historical ballads and stories—the tale of the Byakkotai is especially popular. It is the tragic story of teenage samurai who committed ritual suicide at Mt. Iimoriyama.

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