Irori no Yado Ashina

Irori no Yado Ashina

Ashina is a Japanese-style inn that preserves an atmosphere of old-style living in the Tohoku Region. The facility used to be part of a 120-year-old private residence, which was taken apart, moved and then rebuilt at its present location. An overnight stay at this inn will allow guests to experience several different aspects of traditional Aizu culture, including local cuisine and local sake that can be enjoyed nowhere else. Dinner is served around an irori (sunken hearth), which is a very memorable feature of this inn.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.ashina.co.jp/en.html
Contact

Irori no Yado Ashina (+81) 242-26-2841 info@ashina.co.jp

(+81) 242-26-2841

info@ashina.co.jp

ParkingAvailable
Accommodation details

Capacity: 8 rooms (Accommodates 25 guests)

Room styles: Japanese-style rooms only

Room charge: 1 night stay with two meals: 16,800 yen - 24,150 yen (Tax incl.)

Check in / Check out: From 4:00 PM / Until 10:00 AM

Meals: Charcoal-grilled dishes served around a sunken hearth in the inn's dining room

Hot springs: Simple thermal spring

Pets: Not allowed

Book a roomTripAdvisor.com
Access Details
Access232-1 Shimohara, Yumoto, Higashiyama-machi, Aizu-Wakamatsu City, Fukushima Pref. 965-0814
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 15 min from Aizuwakamatsu I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 20 min bus ride from Aizuwakamatsu Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line) via sightseeing loop bus.

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Cultural Experiences

Paint Your Own Akabeko

What is 'Akabeko'?The akabeko legend started at Enzoji Temple in Yanaizu Town, in the Aizu region. The construction of this temple began in the year 807, but due to a huge earthquake at the end of the seventeenth century, it had to be repaired in 1617. It was during the reconstruction of the temple that the akabeko became a folk legend.It is said that moving the wood and other supplies necessary for the reconstruction work was incredibly difficult because materials had to be transported from various villages upstream of the Tadami River. The materials were heavy and the journey to the temple was long. Cattle were used to transport materials, but many struggled to bear their loads.Then, out of nowhere, appeared a cow with a red coat. (It should be noted that, in the past, the word ‘red’ was used to describe the color ‘brown’, so it is likely that it was a brown cow.) The red cow supported the other cows and helped the priests who were constructing the temple until it was completed. Then, it suddenly vanished.'Akabeko' means 'red cow' in the local dialect.A number of statues of the cow were built inside the temple grounds so that the people of Yanaizu could express their gratitude to the akabeko.In the years following, there was a range of legends about the akabeko, with stories such as families who owned akabeko being rid of sickness upon stroking the cows. They continued to hold their status of bringers of good luck and strength. Families bought or made akabeko toys for their young children to play with.Akabeko Painting ExperiencesIn recent history, the Aizu tradition of painting akabeko began. It is said that this tradition started as something to do for children visiting Aizu-Wakamatsu City as part of school trips. This was when the story of the Akabeko evolved once more, into its newest papier-mâché form. The stripes on the face and back of the papier-mâché Akabeko are said to represent strength and perseverance.There are a number of workshops in Aizu-Wakamatsu City where you can paint your own Akabeko. Most workshops offer the standard red, white, and black paint. These talismans for good health make very cute and lightweight souvenirs to take home for family and friends – or keep for yourself! Those who prefer to buy a ready-painted Akabeko will be able to find it at most souvenir shops.BookingIf you would like to book an akabeko painting experience at the Tsurugajo Kaikan (a shopping complex located next to Tsurugajo Castle), please access this page.

The World Glassware Hall
Cultural Experiences

Chinkin Taiken (Sunken-Gold Design Experience)

The Tradition of Aizu lacquerware in Fukushima Prefecture has continued for 400 years. Try out creating a design on Aizu Lacquerware with a technique called Chinkin ("Sunken-gold") at Tsunoda Lacquer Art Studio. Sketch your design on tracing paper, and then mark it onto the lacqerware with a needle. Tsunoda san will help you fill the grooves created by your needle with gold and silver powder to create your design. Alternatively, try painting your own design on Aizu lacquerware at the studio. Either experience will create a great souvenir of your trip in Japan. These experiences take about an hour.

The World Glassware Hall
Outdoor Activities

Watersports at S.A.Y (Lake Inawashiro)

A wakeboard shop located on the northwest shore of Lake Inawashiro in Fukushima Prefecture. It offers easy access from the Kanto region, bypassing major traffic congestion. Individuals and beginners are welcome. A specialized beginner's course is available, allowing even first-timers to enjoy their time on the water, and all necessary equipment can be rented. Bookings can be made even for 1 person. Why not spend a day enjoying the beautiful, clear waters of Lake Inawashiro, one of the most breathtaking lakes in Japan?

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