Koriyama Nunobiki Kaze-no-Kogen (Koriyama Nunobiki Wind Farm)

Koriyama Nunobiki Kaze-no-Kogen (Koriyama Nunobiki Wind Farm)

These windy highlands are located at the plateau summit of Mt. Aizu-Nunobiki. It’s location to the south of Lake Inawashiro provides ample breeze to power the 33 windmills that stand majestically atop the highland plateau. Nunobiki Kogen Wind Farm is one of Japan's largest wind farms. It's location at an altitude of about 1,000 meters, makes for a truly fantastic view of the surrounding scenery.

From early August to early September, visitors can enjoy amazing vistas of the beautiful himawari batake (sunflower fields). The sunflowers here are planted at 3 different intervals, meaning that visitors can enjoy seeing them throughout the summer months.

Sunflowers aren’t all that Koriyama Nunobiki Kaze-no-Kogen has to offer flower lovers: May brings rapeseed blossoms into full bloom, and later - from August to September - you can see cosmos blooming. Of course, visitors are always greeted with superb views of Lake Inawashiro and Mt. Bandai.

There are walking courses along the plateau, so visitors can explore the area and snap some great photos. One really amazing photo spot can be found at the observatory. Depending on the timing of your visit, you might be able to purchase some local vegetables at temporary stalls. We recommend trying the region’s famous Nunobiki Plateau daikon radish.
 

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.kanko-koriyama.gr.jp/tourism/detail1-0-12.html(Japanese)
Contact

Koriyama City Tourism Association

(+81) 24-924-2621

kankou@city.koriyama.fukushima.jp

Best Season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Autumn
Opening Hours

The wind farm is closed from Dec. to late Apr. due to heavy snow.

ParkingParking spaces available for 7 buses, 92 cars and 2 cars with wheelchairs
Entrance FeeFree
Accommodation details

Pets: Permitted

Access Details
AccessAkatsu, Konan-machi, Koriyama City, Fukushima Pref. 963-1631
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 45 min from Koriyama Minami I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

By Train: 60 min by taxi or rental car from Koriyama Station (JR Tohoku Line)

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