Korinji Temple (Hydrangea Temple)

Korinji Temple (Hydrangea Temple)

Korinji Temple, known as Hydrangea Temple, is home to around 20 kinds of hydrangeas. Many tourists visit every year to see the beautiful blue, purple and pink flowers that bloom from late-June to mid-July.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.nihonmatsu-kanko.jp/?p=319(Automated translation available)
Contact

Nihonmatsu Tourism Federation

(+81) 243-55-5122

info@nihonmatsu-kanko.jp

Best Season
  • Summer
ParkingAvailable (Space for 40 vehicles available)
Entrance FeeFree
Related infoBest time to visit: Mid-Jun. to early Jul.
Access Details
Access1 Nishida, Oota, Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 25 min from Nihonmatsu I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

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Bandai-Azuma Lake Line is a sightseeing road that runs for 13.1 km, connecting Inawashiro Town and Kitashiobara Village. Outstanding backdrops of hundreds of lakes, including Lake Akimoto, Lake Onogawa, and Lake Hibara can be seen from along the road. The Nakatsugawa Valley, which lies half-way along the route, offers a wonderful view of a combination of rock surfaces polished by strong water currents and woodland greenery. A rest-house area with washrooms stands near the valley and visitors can enjoy trekking along the walking trails from the season of fresh green leaves through to the end of the season of red and yellow foliage. The valley is particularly famous as one of the most scenic foliage-viewing spots in Japan with many photographers visiting from both inside and outside of the prefecture. Enjoy a beautiful drive through this landscape when the new leaves of spring are fresh and green or when the autumn beauty of the valley glistens with red and yellow foliage of beeches, buckeyes, and maples.

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