Majyo-no-hitomi (The Witches’ Eye Lake)

Majyo-no-hitomi (The Witches’ Eye Lake)

Majyo-no-hitomi, or The Witches’ Eye Lake, is a volcanic lake that was formed during a volcanic eruption many years ago. Unique minerals in the water cause the lake to appear different colors, giving the lake it’s official name of Goshiki-numa (Five Colored Lake), but most often it is a bright blue. 

The nickname of “Witches Eye” comes from the unique appearance of the lake that is visible in late spring when the snow melts enough so that only a white ring remains around the lake to form the white of what appears to be an enormous single eye.

This lake viewpoint can be reached by an intermediate hike that begins at the Jododaira Visitors Center, stop by for a map and safety information before hiking. 

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://fukushima-guide.jp/discover/jododaira/
Contact

Jododaira Visitor Center

(+81) 24-563-5554

fukushima.guide@f-kankou.jp

Best Season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Autumn
Opening Hours

Closed during the winter (closing coincides with that of the Bandai-Azuma Skyline road)

ParkingJododaira Parking Area (Paid parking)
Related infoBest season: June-October

Access Details
AccessWashikurayama 1, Tsuchiyu Onsen-machi, Fukushima City, Fukushima Pref. 960-2157
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 1 hour drive from the Fukushima-Nishi I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

Nearby

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Museums & Galleries

Fukushima Agricultural Technology Centre

A foothold for the promotion of farming in Fukushima Prefecture - the size of 12 Tokyo Domes! Fukushima Agricultural Technology Centre is a new foothold for the promotion of agricultural in Fukushima Prefecture. It serves as a hub for the spread of technological development and safe agricultural practices, as well as being an important facility for agricultural education. The Centre has strengthened a system of experimentation and research in order to provide technical support to local farmers, and is spreading awareness of the importance of agriculture and of making use of open facilities (such as the Centre's Exchange Building and farming exhibitions) among local consumers and children. The facilities include the Management & Research Building, the Experiment Building, the Exhibition Greenhouse, and the Exchange Building, which is constructed from lumber grown locally in Fukushima Prefecture. From the observation deck, you can take in an expansive view of the entire facility.

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple was built over 1000 years ago in a rocky cavern. The temple can be reached by taking paths lined with century-old Japanese cedar trees, and climbing a 130-step stone staircase. The cave that makes up part of the Yamamoto Fudoson temple grounds is where the Buddhist deity enshrined at this temple is worshipped. Yamamoto Fudoson Temple is located in Yamamoto Park. This park is centered in a valley – 5 km of which is designated as an Okukuji Prefectural Natural Park. A wonderful place for flower-viewing throughout the year, this area is also great for experiencing beautiful autumn leaves.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Miharu Takizakura

Miharu is a small town in central Fukushima Prefecture. The town’s name means “three springs” and it is easy to see how it got such a name. With cherry, plum, and peach trees blossoming in spectacular displays every spring, it is almost as if spring has tripled! But the most famous of the trees in Miharu is the Miharu Takizakura tree, which is a nationally recognized Natural Monument. Over ten centuries old, the beautiful Miharu Takizakura is a flowering cherry tree that spreads out in all directions and makes for a breathtaking vista. The cascading blankets of blossoms are how this tree got the name takizakura, or “waterfall cherry tree.” It is even one of the “three great cherry trees” of Japan (along with Usuzumizakura in Gifu and the Jindaizakura in Yamanashi Prefecture). Miharu Takizakura sits in a sakura hollow in order to protect it from the elements while providing excellent drainage. The heavy boughs of the tree are supported by wooden beams and lend to its elegant form. The Miharu Takizakura begins blooming from mid-April. During the day the sight is whimsical, but visit in the evening and you’ll be treated to an almost haunting beauty as the tree is illuminated. Aside from this huge cherry tree (over 12 meters tall and 18 to 22 meters in spread), the area is also blessed with various wildflowers, including cherry and rapeseed flowers. But, of course, the Miharu Takizakura is what the annual 200,000 visitors are there to see. The view from the base of the sakura is considered to be the most beautiful and the Miharu Takizakura often ranks as the best sakura tree in all of Japan.

The World Glassware Hall
Local Foods

Kunitaya Miso Factory

The Kunitaya Miso Factory is a small shop that was founded in 1777 to produce miso paste for the local community. Miso is one of the most (if not the most) popular flavor for foods in Japan. Many people drink miso flavored soup at least once a day and it isn’t uncommon to find miso soup present in every meal of the day. Before grocery stores and convenience stores were as widespread as they are today, people would go to their neighborhood miso shops to source this kitchen staple Today, many of these small shops have disappeared, however at Kunitaya Miso Factory, the owners want to preserve their small business and the unique culture of small batch local miso makers. The small scale operation allows for more freedom and diversity in flavors. At the café next door, “Kura Café,” you can try different variations and flavors of the miso that they produce at the Kunitaya Miso Factory. The brewery is housed in an old fashioned Japanese ware-house style building with a red lattice front. Years ago, during festivals, the red lattice front was removed to make the building more open to the street and the public. If you are interested in getting a more in depth experience, consider joining a tour of the brewery! Contact us if you are interested.

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