Onsen and Relaxation Tour

  • 3 destinations
  • Multi day

Take a 2-day tour of relaxation, history, and culture on this trip you can enjoy by train or taxi. You’ll journey around Fukushima Prefecture to see some stunning sights and relax in some of the best springs.

Begin your first day at Fukushima Station where you will travel to Iizaka Onsen by a quick bus ride. Iizaka Onsen has been a famous hot spring town of Japan for more than 1,000 years. Soak up the rejuvenating waters and history that has inspired countless artists and poets of the past before moving to Nakano Fudoson Temple. Founded some 800 years ago, this famous temple has three minor deities worshipped on the grounds. Find your own inner peace as you take in the cleansing atmosphere and breathe in the culture and history. From Nakano Fudoson Temple, visit Kyu Horikiri-tei, a former residence of the Horikiri family from the Edo Period. Enjoy soaking your feet in the foot bath and taking this calming scenery. You’ll enjoy your time by both relaxing and exploring the past.

Start

Fukushima Station

Fukushima Sta. to Iizaka Onsen takes 30 min by taxi or train.

View directions

Iizaka Onsen

  • Central Area
  • 45

Fukushima City's Iizaka Onsen has been used as an onsen town for over 1,000 years, and has been visited by legendary figures in Japanese literature such as Matsuo Basho (1644-1694), the master of haiku poems. Locals in Iizaka Onsen pride themselves on the well-known Japanese phrase “Beppu in the West; Iizaka in the East”, which refers to the best onsen towns in Japan.

It takes 10 min by taxi to reach Nakano Fudoson Temple from Iizaka Onsen.

View directions

Nakano Fudoson Temple

  • Central Area
  • 60

Nakano Fudoson is a Zen Buddhist temple built around a waterfall. Nakano Fudoson Temple is dedicated to the Buddhist deity Acala (Fudo in Japanese), one of the Buddhist ‘Kings of Knowledge’. Three forms of this deity can be praised at different areas within this temple.

Nakano Fudoson to Kyu Horikiri-tei takes 15 min by taxi.

View directions

Kyu Horikiri-tei

  • Central Area
  • 40

Kyu Horikiri-tei is a property steeped in history. Built in 1775, the building has been preserved since the Edo Period thanks to wealthy farmers and merchants. The property contains a large kura (storehouse), called Jukken Kura, as well as a traditional Japanese manor house. There is a public footbath located onsite. Use of the public footbath - which gets its water from the nearby onsen hot spring source - is accessible for wheelchair users. Japanese-speaking volunteer guides, knowledgeable about the history of Kyu Horikiri-tei and the rest of Iizaka Onsen, are available upon request.

From Kyu Horikiri-tei, walk for around 10 min back to Iizaka Onsen Sta. From Iizaka Onsen Sta., take the 30 min train back to Fukushima Sta.

View directions
Finish

Fukushima Station

Other Trips

Fukushima’s Revitalization Educational One-Day Trip
Fukushima’s Revitalization Educational One-Day Trip
Fukushima’s Revitalization Educational One-Day Trip
Culture

Fukushima’s Revitalization Educational One-Day Trip

This is a model itinerary for visitors who would like to learn about Fukushima’s revitalization. The coastal area of Fukushima is the only place in the world to have survived a triple disaster: an earthquake, a tsunami and a nuclear disaster. Following extensive decontamination efforts and a great deal of demolition and reconstruction, several areas that were once designated as ‘difficult to return’ have started welcoming both residents and visitors again, with many residents eager to share their stories with the world. This itinerary centers on the towns of Futaba and Namie, both of which were severely affected by the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident in 2011.  The first stop is Futaba station and the surrounding Futaba Art District, a mural art initiative that pays homage to the residents and folk art of the town. From there, you’ll visit the Great East Japan Earthquake and Nuclear Disaster Memorial Museum, which has a detailed account of the area before, during, and after the disaster. At the museum, you’ll learn about the stories and testimonies of locals, as well as the plans and ideas for the future of Fukushima. The last stop is the remains of the Ukedo Elementary School in Namie town. Although the school building, located only 300 meters from the sea, sustained great damage from the tsunami, students, teachers and staff were able to evacuate from the school safely, for which it is known as a ‘miracle’ school.  This is a one-day itinerary, but we recommend staying somewhere in the coastal area of Fukushima after your visit.

Top