Numajiri Kogen Lodge

Numajiri Kogen Lodge

Numajiri Kogen Lodge was previously run by Junko Tabei, the first woman to climb Mt. Everest (who was born in Miharu Town, Fukushima Prefecture), and it has been visited by Sir Edmund Hillary. After being closed, the lodge was renovated, and reopened in November 2019. Guests can enjoy relaxing hot springs, delicious meals cooked with local ingredients, and truly spectacular natural surroundings. Numajiri Kogen Lodge is perfectly situated for guests wanting to enjoy hiking or skiing in the surrounding mountains, including Mt. Adatara and Mt. Bandai.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.numajiri-lodge.com/(Japanese)
Contact

Numajiri Kogen Lodge

(+81) 242-93-8101

ParkingAvailable for guests (Free of charge)
Accommodation details

Capacity: 12 rooms

Room styles: 11 Western-style rooms; 1 Japanese-style room

Room charge: Around 14,500 yen to 52,000 yen~ p/p (per night)

Check in / Check out: From 3:00 PM / Until 10:00 AM

Meals: Japanese / Asian-fusion breakfast & dinner available on-site

Hot springs: Acidic sulfur spring with cloudy waters. Indoor & outdoor shared baths. Lodge includes a room with a private partially open-air bath.

Book a roomTripAdvisor.com
Access Details
AccessNumajiriyama-ko 2864, Inawashiro Town, Yama District, Fukushima Pref. 969-2752
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 25 min drive from Inawashiro Bandaikogen I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 20 min taxi ride from Inawashiro Sta. (JR Ban-etsu West Line)

Nearby

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