Sannokura Plateau Sunflower Field

Sannokura Plateau Sunflower Field

In summer, the 5.4 hectares of land within the Sannokura Ski Resort grounds become painted yellow with 1.5 million sunflowers. The sunflower field consists of 3 main areas, which can be enjoyed from early August to early September. Also, visitors to Sannokura Plateau between March and June can enjoy impressive views of fields of bright, yellow canola flowers. What's more, no matter the season, the panoramic views overlooking the Aizu basin from an elevation of 650 m make a visit to Sannokura Plateau very worthwhile.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.kitakata-kanko.jp/(Japanese)
Contact

Kitakata Tourism and Products Association

(+81) 241-24-5200

Best Season
  • Summer
ParkingAvailable
Entrance FeeFree
Accommodation details

Pets: Permitted

Related infoSunflower Season: Early Aug. to early Sep.
Canola Flower Season: Mar. to Jun.
Access Details
Access857-1, Kitagongenmorikou, Aita, Atsushiokanou-machi, Kitakata-City, Fukushima Prefecture
View directions
Getting there

By Car: Approx. 1 hour from Aizuwakamatsu I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway.

By Train: Get off at Kitakata Station on the Ban-etsu West Line. Form the station, it is approx. 35 min by taxi or rental car.

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