Kannonji-gawa River Cherry Trees

Kannonji-gawa River Cherry Trees

Only a one-minute walk north of Kawageta Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line) is this beautiful 1 km-path along the banks of the Kannonji-gawa River. In the spring the path transforms into a spectacular tunnel of Yoshino cherry trees and weeping cherry trees. Kannonji-gawa River is perhaps the most fantastic place to see cherry blossoms in Fukushima Prefecture; the calming river and the lovely petals falling like snow are a sight that can’t be beat. The lush green bank contrasting with the pale pink blossoms creates an unforgettable scene.

Altogether there are about 200 trees growing along the Kannonji-gawa River on both banks. Additionally, the river maintains its natural curves and bends as it hasn’t undergone any work to adapt its shape to the city surrounding it. It’s one of Fukushima’s most splendid and respected natural landscapes. Currently, the Kannonji-gawa River cherry trees rank number 11 of the best places to see cherry blossoms in the entire Tohoku region!

While enjoying the delicate blossoms and the sweet, fresh air, visitors to Kannonji-gawa River can also enjoy some of the tasty food from street vendors available only during the cherry blossom season. We’d really recommend a springtime picnic right on the river bank with various yatai (food stand) delicacies. Be sure to come back during the evening when the trees are illuminated, and the river transforms into a magical dreamscape.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://bandaisan.or.jp/ib/en/
Contact

Inawashiro Tourism Association

(+81) 242-62-2048

Best Season
  • Spring
Entrance FeeFree
Related infoBest time to see cherry blossoms: Late April
Access Details
AccessAlong the Kannonji-gawa River, Kawageta, Inawashiro Town, Yama District, Fukushima Pref. 969-2663
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min from Inawashiro Bandaikogen I.C. off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 3 min walk from Kawageta Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line)

Nearby

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