Tenkyodai Showa-no-Mori Park

Tenkyodai Showa-no-Mori Park

Tenkyodai Showa-no-Mori Park (天鏡台・昭和の森公園) is a wide plateau close to Mount Bandai in Inawashiro Town, famous for its impressive views of Lake Inawashiro surrounded by lush greenery. East Asian and Somei Yoshino cherry blossom trees bloom spectacularly, typically from early to mid May, against the backdrop of the mountains. 

During autumn, the rows of colorful red and orange trees make for an unmissable sight. Visitors can follow the strolling paths and enjoy 30 or 60 minute hikes.

From the viewing platform, don’t miss the incredible sights of lake Inawashiro and Mt. Bandai.

Best season for sakura viewing (previous years): Early to Mid-May (dates vary each year).

Please note that the park closes during winter (approximately from December until mid-April).

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://bandaisan.or.jp/ib/en/?welcome=hide
Contact

Inawashiro Tourist Association
(+81) 0242-62-2048

Best Season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Autumn
Opening Hours

8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

ParkingParking spaces available for 200 cars
Entrance FeeFree
Access Details
AccessTenkyodai, Nagata, Inawashiro Town, Yama District, Fukushima Pref. 969-3100
View directions
Getting there

By car: 20 min. from the Inawashiro-Bandaikogen IC exit off the the Ban'etsu Expressway. 10 min. from the JR Okinashima Station (JR Ban'etsu West Line).

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Bandaisan Gold Line

The Bandaisan Gold Line road connects Bandai Kogen, a highland rich with lakes diverse in shapes and size, and various alpine plants, and the Aizu area, which has an immensely rich and fascinating history. This submontane sightseeing road offers diverse views of Mt. Bandai (known in Japanese as 'Bandai-san') and can lead visitors to either the mountain's rugged caldera or to the picturesque Lake Inawashiro. Visitors can discover new hidden gems every time they explore the Gold Line by car, making it a very popular spot to return to among tourists and locals. The area surrounding the road is known as a foliage-viewing spot with hairpin curves that carve through the woodlands. On the walking trail that leads to Baya-ike, a "phantom" waterfall, visitors can take in the beauty of the landscape as they hike. The most highly recommended walking course extends from Happodai to the Oguninuma wetlands, where in late June, visitors are greeted by ban array of beautiful, broad dwarf day-lilies.

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

Sazaedo Temple

Sazaedo is a Buddhist temple built in 1796. Its architecture is similar in shape to the shell of a horned turban (‘sazae’ in Japanese), hence its name "Sazaedo". The inside of the temple consists of a double-helix slope, meaning that visitors who come to pray will not meet anybody coming from the opposite direction. This one-way system makes Sazaedo extremely unique.In 1995, it was appointed as a National Important Cultural Property, and in 2018 it was showcased in Michelin Green Guide (1 star, interesting place to visit).

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Lake Inawashiro
Nature & Scenery

Lake Inawashiro

Japan's fourth-largest freshwater lake, Lake Inawashiro is situated in Bandai Asahi National Park. It is also known as the “Heavenly Mirror Lake” and has a surface area of 104 square kilometers! The combination of Lake Inawashiro and Mt. Bandai form one of Aizu's representative landscapes. And being less than three hours from Tokyo by shinkansen and local train means that you have easy access from a major transport hub.The lake offers year-round fun. Enjoy cherry blossoms in spring at Iwahashi Shrine, one of Aizu’s five famous cherry trees. Summer at Lake Inawashiro is slightly cooler than the rest of Fukushima, so take advantage of camping by the lakeshore, and a wide variety of marine sports. Colored leaves and hikes are the popular thing to do in autumn, view the fiery hues and take in the crisp air. In winter, visitors can enjoy fresh powder snow and winter thrills in the form of skiing and snowboarding; and you can even catch a glimpse of migrating swans on the shores.It’s truly a beauty no matter when you decide to visit. There are also a wide range of scenic spots from where visitors can take photographs and soak in the view. It’s a great place to escape from the stress of work and life or just to experience Japanese nature and landscapes.Lake Inawashiro's size means that it is accessible from a number of sightseeing spots, including Tenkyokaku stately house and Hideo Noguchi Memorial Museum (a museum dedicated to the life and work of a Japanese scientist famous for his research on yellow fever). There’s plenty more to do nearby: view some amazing works by international artists at the Morohashi Museum of Modern Art, or visit the rainbow-colored Goshiki-numa Ponds.

Byobuiwa Crags
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Byobuiwa Crags

The Byobuiwa Crags (屏風岩) are a rock formation in Minamiaizu, in the Southern area of Fukushima Prefecture. The rocks have eroded through many years to their current shape. The crags are light in color, offering an interesting contrast with the blue of the gushing Ina river, and the vibrant colors of the surrounding foliage, creating a scenery that becomes particularly poignant during the autumn. Visitors can stroll the walking course around the crags, which takes approximately 20 minutes to be completed and includes several interesting picture spots.

Mt. Bandai
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Mt. Bandai

Originally known as Iwahashi-yama, literally a rock ladder to the sky, the renamed Mt. Bandai is no less impressive. Often referred to as 'Aizu's Mt. Fuji', Mt. Bandai is one of the 100 most famous mountains in Japan, and has even been selected as one of the top 100 geographic landmarks in Japan. In 2011, the mountain was certified as a geopark, which is a unified area with geological heritage and international significance, as defined by UNESCO. There are seven climbing routes for Mt. Bandai, with the trail starting at the Happodai trailhead being the most popular, and easiest route. From the Happodai trailhead, the 3.5 km route takes around 2 hours to reach the summit.The various routes range from 2 to 4 hours and from 3 to 7 km. At Koubou Shimizu, one of the mountain stops, there are two shops where trekkers can buy drinks, snacks, and souvenirs, but please note that there is no accommodation available. For many Buddhist mountain fanatics, Mt. Bandai holds a place of great significance. Enichi-ji Temple, located on the southwestern foot of Mt. Bandai, is a popular temple to visit nearby. The mountains situated around the temple make for a serene vista where one can feel the power of nature. Enichi-ji Temple was founded one year after Mt. Bandai erupted, in 807 C.E.; in the past, some superstitious people believed there was a connection between the eruption and the temple’s founding... Interestingly, Mt. Bandai used to be shaped more like the famous Mt. Fuji, but after a volcanic eruption in 1888, the shape changed to what we see today. It is thanks to that eruption that the mountain gained its rugged, sharp look and the Urabandai area behind Mt. Bandai was created. For non-hikers, the Bandaisan Gold Line is a popular sightseeing road that leads up the southwestern side and offers brilliant vistas of the foliage, especially in autumn when the colors change.

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