Inawashiro Herb Garden

Inawashiro Herb Garden

The breeze from the nearby Lake Inawashiro, seasonal flowers, and art displays of the Inawashiro Herb Garden await your visit!

The outdoor garden area is around 100,000 square meters and is filled with various herbs, flowers, and plants that bloom at different times on the year, creating a unique visitor experience that changes with the seasons! The park has around 500 varieties or herbs, flowers, and plants including: lavender, mint, chamomile, nanohana blossoms, poppies, sunflowers, cosmos, and kochia! 

There is an indoor greenhouse area, so, even on rainy days, visitors have plenty of greenery and flowers to see! In addition to the herbs, flowers, and plants you will also find seasonal decorations and original art displays that are created and updated for guests to enjoy.

The outdoor garden area of the Inawashiro Herb Garden also features 5 m-tall wooden statues carved by a Canadian artist, Glen Greenside. The 12 statues, one for each zodiac sign, were carved over the course of twelve years as part of a now-discontinued annual chainsaw festival that took place at the garden.

Inside, at the shop, visitors can find products and snacks that are made from various herbs and flowers.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.listel-inawashiro.jp/english/
Contact

Inawashiro Herb Garden

(+81) 242-66-2690

inawashiro-herbgarden@listel-hotels.com

Best Season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Autumn
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Closed for winter between Dec. and Mar.

ParkingAvailable
Entrance FeeAdults (Junior high school students and above): 310 yen
Elementary school students: 210 yen
Groups of over 15 people: 50 yen discount per person
Access Details
AccessListel Park, Kawageta, Inawashiro town, Fukushima pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Train: 10 min taxi ride from Inawashiro Station (JR Tohoku Main Line)

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Enzoji Temple

A symbolic temple of Aizu, Enzoji was built about 1,300 years ago in 807. Fukuman Kokuzo Enzoji Temple (Enzoji Temple for short) was built by Tokuichi Daishi, a noted priest from the Aizu region. The main hall of the temple rises high above a huge crag. From here, the Tadami River can be viewed flowing magnificently through the town. You can also see the various views of each season, with cherry blossoms in spring, mist over the river in summer, red maples in autumn, and snow in winter. The temple has many highlights, such as a treasure house and monuments in memory of poets, inscribed with their poems and haiku. The temple is dedicated to Fukuman Kokuzo Bosatsu (the Bodhisattva of wisdom). There are many legends associated with the temple. For example, one legend tells of how when Kobo Daishi threw wood shavings from the statue of Kokuzo Bosatsu into the Tadami River, they immediately turned into countless Japanese dace fish. Another story is about how a red cow helped with the difficult construction of the temple - a story which led to the widespread acceptance of the "akabeko" red cow as an important symbol of Fukushima. One more story is that of Nanokado Hadaka Mairi ("Naked Man Festival" at Nanukado Temple). The legends are many and varied.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Natural Sparkling Water in Kaneyama Town

Kaneyama Town is a scenic, rural town surrounded by woods. One of the most famous things about Kaneyama Town is its well of naturally carbonated water. Such water is rarely found in Japan. Small bubbles are infused into the water, giving it a gentle and smooth taste. Locals and visitors take empty bottles to the well to fill and take back home. There is a pot at the well that can be used to collect water from the base of the well. Pulling up water from the bottom with a rope definitely makes for a fun and unique experience! Why don’t you try this natural sparkling water while enjoying the beautiful scenery in Kaneyama?

You might also like

Sannokura Plateau Sunflower Field
Nature & Scenery

Sannokura Plateau Sunflower Field

In summer, the 5.4 hectares of land within the Sannokura Ski Resort grounds become painted yellow with 1.5 million sunflowers. The sunflower field consists of 3 main areas, which can be enjoyed from early August to early September. Also, visitors to Sannokura Plateau between March and June can enjoy impressive views of fields of bright, yellow canola flowers. What's more, no matter the season, the panoramic views overlooking the Aizu basin from an elevation of 650 m make a visit to Sannokura Plateau very worthwhile.

Bandaisan Gold Line
Nature & Scenery

Bandaisan Gold Line

The Bandaisan Gold Line road connects Bandai Kogen, a highland rich with lakes diverse in shapes and size, and various alpine plants, and the Aizu area, which has an immensely rich and fascinating history. This submontane sightseeing road offers diverse views of Mt. Bandai (known in Japanese as 'Bandai-san') and can lead visitors to either the mountain's rugged caldera or to the picturesque Lake Inawashiro. Visitors can discover new hidden gems every time they explore the Gold Line by car, making it a very popular spot to return to among tourists and locals. The area surrounding the road is known as a foliage-viewing spot with hairpin curves that carve through the woodlands. On the walking trail that leads to Baya-ike, a "phantom" waterfall, visitors can take in the beauty of the landscape as they hike. The most highly recommended walking course extends from Happodai to the Oguninuma wetlands, where in late June, visitors are greeted by ban array of beautiful, broad dwarf day-lilies.

Tenkyokaku
Nature & Scenery

Tenkyokaku

Named by the Crown Prince Yoshihito upon its opening in 1907 as “The Palace of Heaven’s Mirror”, Tenkyokaku is a decadently decorated former villa. Imperial Prince Arisugawa Takehito decided to build Tenkyokaku after being impressed by the beauty of Lake Inawashiro during a visit to the Tohoku District. His family, the Arisugawa-no-miya Family, owned the villa until 1952, when it was granted to Fukushima Prefecture. Tenkyokaku has since been used as a meeting hall and a space for lectures and exhibitions. The former villa, its annex and its front gate have been specified as important cultural properties of Japan. Despite being restored in 1984, the building retains many of its original features, including the impressive chandelier which can be seen below. Despite no longer being able to see Lake Inawashiro from the windows of Tenkyokaku, the luxurious renaissance-style architecture and liberal use of all things gold and glittery means that visitors will by all means feel that its name still rings true. For only 520 yen, you can dress up in a traditional outfit and take as many photos as you would like in the building!

Top