The Grave of the Matsudaira Family

The Grave of the Matsudaira Family

The gravesite was constructed in 1657 when Masayori, the heir of the first Aizu lord Hoshina Masayuki, passed away. Tombs for the second lord Masatsune through the ninth lord Takamori, as well as their wives and children, stand side by side. A Buddhist funeral was conducted for the second lord, but the Shinto style was used for all the other lords. This gravesite is one of Japan’s top daimyo family graves, and is known for its history and scale. The Grave of the Matsudaira Family has also been nationally recognized as an Important Historic Site.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://samurai-city.jp/en/sightseeing/1278
Contact

Aizu-Wakamatsu Tourism Bureau

(+81) 242-39-1251

Best SeasonAll Year
ParkingNone
Entrance FeeFree
Access Details
AccessIshiyama, Higashiyama-machi, Aizu-Wakamatsu City, Fukushima Pref. 965-0813
View directions
Getting there

By Train: Take the Haikara-san or Akabe sightseeing loop bus from Aizuwakamatsu Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line) and alight at Innai bus stop. Then walk for 5 min.

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Lake Inawashiro

Japan's fourth-largest freshwater lake, Lake Inawashiro is situated in Bandai Asahi National Park. It is also known as the “Heavenly Mirror Lake” and has a surface area of 104 square kilometers! The combination of Lake Inawashiro and Mt. Bandai form one of Aizu's representative landscapes. And being less than three hours from Tokyo by shinkansen and local train means that you have easy access from a major transport hub. The lake offers year-round fun. Enjoy cherry blossoms in spring at Iwahashi Shrine, one of Aizu’s five famous cherry trees. Summer at Lake Inawashiro is slightly cooler than the rest of Fukushima, so take advantage of camping by the lakeshore, and a wide variety of marine sports. Colored leaves and hikes are the popular thing to do in autumn, view the fiery hues and take in the crisp air. In winter, visitors can enjoy fresh powder snow and winter thrills in the form of skiing and snowboarding; and you can even catch a glimpse of migrating swans on the shores. It’s truly a beauty no matter when you decide to visit. There are also a wide range of scenic spots from where visitors can take photographs and soak in the view. It’s a great place to escape from the stress of work and life or just to experience Japanese nature and landscapes. Lake Inawashiro's size means that it is accessible from a number of sightseeing spot, including Tenkyokaku stately house and Hideo Noguchi Memorial Museum (a museum dedicated to the life and work of a Japanese scientist famous for his research on yellow fever). There’s plenty more to do nearby: view some amazing works by international artists at the Morohashi Museum of Modern Art, or visit the rainbow-colored Goshiki-numa Ponds.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Tatsuzawa Fudo Falls

Breathe in the cool, crisp negative ion air and relax under the shade of trees as you marvel at the beauty of the Tatsuzawa Fudo Falls. Two waterfalls make up the Tatsuzawa Fudo Falls; Odaki is considered the male fall and is the larger of the two (16 m tall), while the smaller of the two is considered female and called Medaki. The sight is indeed lovely to behold as the silvery waterfalls over the rocks below. The Tatsuzawa Fudo Falls are located in Inawashiro Town and are beautiful year-round. These falls are also a treasure for photographers because of how serene they are surrounded by nature on all sides. In spring and summer, the lush greenery makes the whole forest feel alive; in autumn, the vibrant colors of the leaves reflect off the water and give it a painterly feel. With proper snow equipment, you can even visit in winter and see the stark contrast falls against the white snow. The drive up to the falls is only 15 minutes from central Inawashiro Town, and there’s a small parking lot about a 10-minute hike from the falls. The walk itself is easy and smooth. You’ll first pass Lady Medaki before arriving at the main Odaki falls. And with maple trees framing the waterfall just perfectly, you’ll want to be sure to remember your camera and perhaps a tripod as well. There is even nearby onsen for you to stay and relax afterward. So why not visit the falls to relax your mind and soul, and then go for a soothing dip in the hot springs to rejuvenate your body. You won’t be disappointed with the vista of the falls or the nearby area.

The World Glassware Hall
Shopping & Souvenirs

Tsurugajo Kaikan

Tsurugajo Kaikan is a shopping complex next to Tsurugajo Castle. Here you can try local cuisine, from Wappa Meshi and Sauce Katsudon, to soba noodles and Kitakata Ramen. The French restaurant "Racines" is also on the premises, so that both Japanese and western-style cuisines can be enjoyed in one location. The restaurants have seating for approximately 1,000 guests. The first floor contains a tax-free shop that sells local Aizu goods and souvenirs, from ready-to-cook Kitakata Ramen, soba noodles, Japanese pickles, and sweet treats, to traditional crafts like Akabeko lucky red cow. You can even try painting your own Akabeko cow (a traditional folk toy which is said to bring luck), and take it home as a souvenir of your trip. Painting an Akabeko takes about 30 minutes, and a reservation is required for groups. The parking area accommodates full-size buses as well as personal vehicles.  

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Aizu Bukeyashiki (Samurai Residence)
Historical Sites

Aizu Bukeyashiki (Samurai Residence)

Aizu Bukeyashiki (Samurai Residence) is an historical open-air museum where visitors can learn about the history of Aizu and sample some of the specialty products of Fukushima. Stroll around the residences to take in traditional Japanese architecture, including the residence of Tanomo Saigo, the Aizu Domain's chief retainer, a magistrate's office, a tea ceremony house, a rice mill, and a warehouse (resource center). Visitors can also enjoy local specialty food at the onsite Kuyotei restaurant, and find specialty products from Aizu and other parts of Fukushima at Sato-Kobo Kokon, as well as enjoying hand-painting traditional toys and practicing Japanese archery, which is perfect for young kids. Besides such cultural enjoyment, the natural beauty of the spring cherry blossoms and the autumnal foliage are a major attraction for tourists.

Oyakuen Garden
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Oyakuen Garden

Oyakuen was used approximately 600 years ago as a villa for the then lord of the Aizu Domain. Subsequently, in the mid-17th century, the lord of the Aizu Domain started growing medicinal herbs within the grounds which he developed to protect the citizenry from epidemics. This lead to the garden gaining the name "Oyakuen", which literally means "medicinal garden." The traditional garden has been preserved as it was long ago, and Oyakuen has now been designated as an important national asset. The buildings within the grounds were used by the lord as a place of relaxation and for entertainment. Accordingly, Oyakuen still contains buildings devoted to Japanese tea. Visitors can enjoy a cup of herbal tea here even today.

Nanokamachi-dori Street
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Nanokamachi-dori Street

Nanokamachi-dori Street is a quaint shopping street with an olde-worlde atmosphere, located in central Aizu-Wakamatsu City. There is a mix of western-style buildings, and traditional Japanese architecture, including Japanese-style storehouses and wooden town houses, from the Taisho Period (1912-1926). This street is home to a number of shops selling local products such as Aizu lacquerware and Aizu momen (cotton made in the Aizu area). Nanokamachi-dori Street is a great spot to grab a bite to eat, and is also useful as a base to explore Aizu-Wakamatsu City. Suehiro Sake Brewery and Suzuzen lacquerware shop are just two of the esteemed businesses located close to this shopping street.

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