Majyo-no-hitomi (The Witches’ Eye Lake)

Majyo-no-hitomi (The Witches’ Eye Lake)

Majyo-no-hitomi, or The Witches’ Eye Lake, is a volcanic lake that was formed during a volcanic eruption many years ago. Unique minerals in the water cause the lake to appear different colors, giving the lake it’s official name of Goshiki-numa (Five Colored Lake), but most often it is a bright blue. 

The nickname of “Witches Eye” comes from the unique appearance of the lake that is visible in late spring when the snow melts enough so that only a white ring remains around the lake to form the white of what appears to be an enormous single eye.

This lake viewpoint can be reached by an intermediate hike that begins at the Jododaira Visitors Center, stop by for a map and safety information before hiking. 

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://fukushima-guide.jp/discover/jododaira/
Contact

Jododaira Visitor Center

(+81) 24-563-5554

fukushima.guide@f-kankou.jp

Best Season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Autumn
Opening Hours

Closed during the winter (closing coincides with that of the Bandai-Azuma Skyline road)

ParkingJododaira Parking Area (Paid parking)
Related infoBest season: June-October

Access Details
AccessWashikurayama 1, Tsuchiyu Onsen-machi, Fukushima City, Fukushima Pref. 960-2157
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 1 hour drive from the Fukushima-Nishi I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

Nearby

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Nature & Scenery

Bandai-Azuma Lake Line

Bandai-Azuma Lake Line is a sightseeing road that runs for 13.1 km, connecting Inawashiro Town and Kitashiobara Village. Outstanding backdrops of hundreds of lakes, including Lake Akimoto, Lake Onogawa, and Lake Hibara can be seen from along the road. The Nakatsugawa Valley, which lies half-way along the route, offers a wonderful view of a combination of rock surfaces polished by strong water currents and woodland greenery. A rest-house area with washrooms stands near the valley and visitors can enjoy trekking along the walking trails from the season of fresh green leaves through to the end of the season of red and yellow foliage. The valley is particularly famous as one of the most scenic foliage-viewing spots in Japan with many photographers visiting from both inside and outside of the prefecture. Enjoy a beautiful drive through this landscape when the new leaves of spring are fresh and green or when the autumn beauty of the valley glistens with red and yellow foliage of beeches, buckeyes, and maples.

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Hot Springs

Takayu Onsen

This famous hot spring area is located at an altitude of approximately 750 meters, which is why it’s called 'taka-yu' ('taka' means 'high-up' and 'yu' means 'hot spring'). Located on the slopes of the Azuma mountain range, Takayu Onsen area was once known as “Shinobu Takayu” and, together with Zao Takayu and Shirabu Takayu, prospered as one of three Takayu in what was once known as the northern Ou region. The waters of Takayu Onsen are a bluish milky color and are thought to have healing properties. Most of the resort facilities of the area neither add water nor adjust the temperature in order to maintain the natural allure of the hot spring waters. After bathing in the waters of this spring, your skin becomes almost slippery from the high acidic and hydrogen sulfide makeup. In the Takayu Onsen area, there are 10 natural hot spring sources, with names such as 'Takinoyu', 'Netsuyu', and 'Senkinoyu'. These sources are named after old public baths. In the olden days, bathtubs were built right next to or directly above the hot spring source. Today, the bathing facilities still receive their water flowing directly from the same source. Nowadays, Takayu Onsen consists of about a dozen ryokan (traditional Japanese inns), all offering their unique charm to travelers. You’ll be pleased to note that many of the ryokan open their hot spring baths to non-staying guests for a small fee. The most famous hot spring facility in Takayu Onsen is Tamagoyu, a wooden bathhouse with a traditional feel. There’s even a foot bath in the center of the town open to the public. If public bathing isn’t something you feel comfortable with, many of the onsen facilities in the area also offer private onsen rooms with a rotenburo (open-air bath) available for your own use. It is a relaxing experience unlike any other to soak in the hot waters and feel your worries melt away.

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Nature & Scenery

Yuyu Land Hanawa Dahlia Park

Yuyu Land Hanawa Dahlia Park is located within Yuyu Land Hanawa hot spring and accommodation facility. 300 kinds of 5000 dahlias bloom in approximately 7000 ㎡ site from summer to autumn at the Dahlia Park. Hanawa Town is home to 18 small dahlia gardens including 4 located in elementary and junior high schools. The best time to visit in order to see these flowers is between August and October. An annual dahlia festival is held in Hanawa Town every year to celebrate these vibrant flowers.

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Nature & Scenery

Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons)

Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons) is a lawn-covered agricultural park of about 8 ha in size. There are western-inspired brick buildings in the center, which house a traditional crafts gallery. The gallery includes a glass workshop and kokeshi (traditional wooden doll) exhibit. You can learn to make blown glass, see kokeshi being made by local artisans, and try your hand at decorating a doll of your own. Shiki no Sato also has an ice cream shop offering seasonal ice creams made with the local fruits of Fukushima. In addition to ice cream, you can try a variety of locally-produced beers at the Shiki no Sato's beer hall. The seasonal flowers are a highlight of a visit to Shiki no Sato, which is loved by families and young couples alike. The summertime firework displays and the winter light-ups in the park are some of the most popular times to visit.

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Bandai-Azuma Lake Line

Bandai-Azuma Lake Line is a sightseeing road that runs for 13.1 km, connecting Inawashiro Town and Kitashiobara Village. Outstanding backdrops of hundreds of lakes, including Lake Akimoto, Lake Onogawa, and Lake Hibara can be seen from along the road. The Nakatsugawa Valley, which lies half-way along the route, offers a wonderful view of a combination of rock surfaces polished by strong water currents and woodland greenery. A rest-house area with washrooms stands near the valley and visitors can enjoy trekking along the walking trails from the season of fresh green leaves through to the end of the season of red and yellow foliage. The valley is particularly famous as one of the most scenic foliage-viewing spots in Japan with many photographers visiting from both inside and outside of the prefecture. Enjoy a beautiful drive through this landscape when the new leaves of spring are fresh and green or when the autumn beauty of the valley glistens with red and yellow foliage of beeches, buckeyes, and maples.

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