Nicchu Line Weeping Cherry Blossom

Nicchu Line Weeping Cherry Blossom

The tracks of the now-closed Nicchu Railway Line have been restored as a cycling and walking path, from which you can view 1,000 weeping cherry blossom trees along a 3 km stretch. A steam train is also displayed near the Kitakata Plaza.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.kitakata-kanko.jp/category/detail.php?id=104(Japanese)
Contact

Kitakata Tourism and Product Association

(+81) 241-24-5200

Best Season
  • Spring
ParkingPaid parking
Entrance FeeFree
Related infoBest time to see cherry blossoms: Mid to Late April
Access Details
Access2 Oshikiri Higashi, Kitakata City, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 35 min drive from the Aizuwakamatsu I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway.

By Train: 5 min walk from Kitakata Station on the JR Ban-etsu West Line

Useful Links

Destination Spotlight: Nicchu Line Weeping Cherry Blossom

Fukushima's Top Cherry Blossom Spots

Cycling in Kitakata City

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