Relaxing Tea Ceremony at Tsurugajo Castle

Relaxing Tea Ceremony at Tsurugajo Castle

When visiting Tsurugajo Castle, remember to check out the Rinkaku Tea Ceremony Room, which is situated inside the castle grounds. The beautiful Japanese garden surrounding the tea room is well worth a visit. What's more, you can enjoy traditional Japanese matcha tea together with a seasonal treat, all while looking out at the fantastic foliage of the garden.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.tsurugajo.com/language/eng/
Contact

Aizu-Wakamatsu City Tourism Bureau

(+81) 242-27-4005

info@tsurugajo.com

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

8:30 AM - 5:00 PM (Last entrance at 4:30 PM)

Open every day

Related infoPrices:
Adult: 210 yen (Admission is include in the Tsurugajo Castle-Rinkaku Tea Room joint ticket, which costs 520 yen)
Matcha tea set (with Japanese confectionary): 600 yen
(Admission fee required separately)
Access Details
AccessOtemachi 1-1, Aizu-Wakamatsu City, Fukushima Pref. 965-0873
View directions
Getting there

By Taxi: 10 min taxi ride from Nishi-Wakamatsu Station.

By Bus: The nearest bus stops serving the castle are Tsurugajo Kita-guchi (Tsurugajo Castle North Entrance) and Tsurugajo Nishi (Tsuruga-jo West).

The nearest stops on the "Haikara-san" bus route are Tsurugajo Kita-guchi and San-no-Maru.

Related trips

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Cultural Experiences

Kuimaru Elementary School

Kuimaru Elementary School is a historic Japanese school that was built during the Showa era of Japan, making it over 80 years old! In the 1980s, a modern elementary school was built nearby, leaving this old school house abandoned. Fortunately, this building was preserved and converted into a museum. It happens to be one of only a handful of old fashioned schools left standing in Japan! Here you can explore the old school grounds including a large ginkgo tree that is over 100 years old. A long standing symbol of the school. In Autumn (early to mid-November) the leaves turn a beautiful golden yellow, and when they fall, the school yard is carpeted in these golden leaves. The school building has undergone some light renovations, but the charm of this old building has been beautifully preserved. Inside the building you can wander through the halls and explore the classrooms, you can sit at the little wooden desks, page through some old textbooks and imagine what it would have been like to be a student here around 80 years ago! Fun fact: The school building was once used as a filming location for the 2013 movie Hameln (ハーメルン). After you explore the school if you are feeling a bit hungry, there is a café next door called “Soba Café SCHOLA” that serves 100% buckwheat noodles (soba noodles) as well as other dishes created with 100% buckwheat (soba) flour. These dishes are naturally gluten-free and delicious.

The World Glassware Hall
Outdoor Activities

Snowshoe Trekking

Blue sky, endlessly-fresh dancing powder snow. Come and enjoy this fascinating winter wonderland! The field covered with a marsh and bushes in summer, changes to a white snow field ideal for snowshoe trekking in winter. No skills or previous experience is necessary. You can enjoy the snow-covered world from the very day you start. Snowshoe trekking can even be enjoyed by those who are not athletic. You can walk on lakes or ponds. You can find the tracks of rabbits and squirrels in the forest. Let's enjoy a great variety of nature which can only be seen in winter in Urabandai.

The World Glassware Hall
Arts & Crafts

Aizu Hongo Pottery Workshops

A little-known treasure, Aizu Hongo pottery (known in Japanese as 'hongo-yaki') is the oldest type of pottery in the Tohoku region. Aizu Hongo pottery's history dates back to the Warring States Period (1467 – 1615), when Ujisato Gamo, leader of the Aizu clan, ordered renovations be made to Tsurugajo Castle. The production of ceramic tiles for the castle roof kick-started the tradition of making pottery in Aizu-Misato Town. During the early 1600s, Masayuki Hoshina (who founded the Matsudaira house) invited ceramic craftsmen to Aizu-Misato from Owari - a region famous for its pottery - in order to increase the skills of locals. It was from this time that Aizu Hongo-yaki production began in earnest. At the peak of its popularity, there were more than 100 potteries in the town. There are currently 13 left, which are centered around Setomachi in Aizu-Misato. The rich variety of wares produced from workshop to workshop is just one of the fascinating things about visiting the area. Aizu-Misato Town is also known for the area's unusual ability to produce both great-quality earthenware and delicate porcelain. Please enjoy taking a look around the various shops, workshops, and kilns, and try making pottery for yourself!

The World Glassware Hall
Cultural Experiences

Kimono Experience in Aizu-Wakamatsu City

You can now try on yukata or kimono at Tsuruga Kimono Rental Shop, which opened in April 2019. Tsuruga Kimono Rental Shop is located on the second floor of Tsurugajo Kaikan, which is right next to Tsurugajo Castle in Aizu-Wakamatsu City. Rent a kimono or yukata and take photos with friends and family in front of the castle, or venture a bit further to the historical Nanokamachi-dori Street to feel like you have stepped back in time. Come and make some great memories in Aizu-Wakamatsu City!

You might also like

Mitsuishi Shrine (Three Stones Shrine)
Cultural Experiences

Mitsuishi Shrine (Three Stones Shrine)

The Mitsuishi Shrine (Three Stones Shrine) is located a short 10-minute walk from Tadami Station in Tadami Town. Ichinoiwa, Ninoiwa and Saniwa are the three large stones that have spritual significance.  Ichinoiwa (the first stone) is thought to improve intelligence, Ninoiwa (the second stone) is thought to improve eyesight, and Saniwa (the third stone) is thought to improve connections with others, particularly romantic love. The Saniwa is a popular place to visit for those who are hoping to get married someday. To reach the shrine there is a short hike through dense forest, so it is recommended that visitors wear shoes that are easy to walk in.

Mori no Bunko Fuzawa
Cultural Experiences

Mori no Bunko Fuzawa

Mori no Bunko Fuzawa is a mountain village life workshop facility where guests can experience the lifestyle, nature, and charms of living in a Japanese rural mountain village. [photo id="wedA3wsHghGka5MbrORGYjRkj8BGAinlLCOG5O0L.jpg"] This building was a working school up to 40 years ago, the black board in one classroom where all of the students wrote their goodbye messages on the last day of school has been preserved as is. (If you visit, please be sure to avoid touching, erasing, or writing on the black board.) [photo id="fNNbYszCkKk3qvw1ozp5lY5yn8UDJPkrsrHf05Jf.jpg"] All three classrooms are available to stay the night in! Guests are charged per person, not per room, so if your group are the only ones staying the night then you are free to spread out into all three of the rooms. This is the kind of lodging that Japanese students would stay in on overnight school trips, so there is a sense of nostalgia when staying here.  There are also many different activities that you can experience when staying here, such as local and traditional craft making and even river trekking with local guides! Read more about river trekking experiences here. [photo id="YrRrT5cHuDe3wK75RWrxgat8d8JPQP9P7bQgJwuY.jpg"]

Kuimaru Elementary School
Cultural Experiences

Kuimaru Elementary School

Kuimaru Elementary School is a historic Japanese school that was built during the Showa era of Japan, making it over 80 years old! In the 1980s, a modern elementary school was built nearby, leaving this old school house abandoned. Fortunately, this building was preserved and converted into a museum. It happens to be one of only a handful of old fashioned schools left standing in Japan! Here you can explore the old school grounds including a large ginkgo tree that is over 100 years old. A long standing symbol of the school. In Autumn (early to mid-November) the leaves turn a beautiful golden yellow, and when they fall, the school yard is carpeted in these golden leaves. The school building has undergone some light renovations, but the charm of this old building has been beautifully preserved. Inside the building you can wander through the halls and explore the classrooms, you can sit at the little wooden desks, page through some old textbooks and imagine what it would have been like to be a student here around 80 years ago! Fun fact: The school building was once used as a filming location for the 2013 movie Hameln (ハーメルン). After you explore the school if you are feeling a bit hungry, there is a café next door called “Soba Café SCHOLA” that serves 100% buckwheat noodles (soba noodles) as well as other dishes created with 100% buckwheat (soba) flour. These dishes are naturally gluten-free and delicious.

Top