Yamatogawa Sake Brewery

Yamatogawa Sake Brewery

Close to Kitakata station is Yamatogawa Brewery. This brewery was built in 1790 in the Edo Era, and has been producing sake ever since.

The famous sake cultivated at this brewery is made using the clear, mountain water from Mt Iide. Another important component of Yamatogawa Brewery’s sake is the use of high-quality, carefully cultivated rice. This rice is grown in Yamatogawa Brewery’s own rice fields, and from the fields of selected local farming families.

Next door to the brewery is the Northern Museum – where old earthen storehouses built during the Edo Era have been opened up to the public. Here you can learn about how the sake-making process has changed since the Edo period. Tours and sake tasting available for free.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.yauemon.co.jp/
Contact

Yamatogawa Brewery

(+81) 241-22-2233

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Entrance FeeFree
Access Details
Access4761 Teramachi, Kitakata City, Fukushima Pref. 966-0861
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 30 min from the Aizuwakamatsu I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 15 min walk (or 5 min taxi ride) from Kitakata Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line)

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