Tenkyokaku

Tenkyokaku

Named by the Crown Prince Yoshihito upon its opening in 1907 as “The Palace of Heaven’s Mirror”, Tenkyokaku is a decadently decorated former villa. Imperial Prince Arisugawa Takehito decided to build Tenkyokaku after being impressed by the beauty of Lake Inawashiro during a visit to the Tohoku District. His family, the Arisugawa-no-miya Family, owned the villa until 1952, when it was granted to Fukushima Prefecture.

Tenkyokaku has since been used as a meeting hall and a space for lectures and exhibitions. The former villa, its annex and its front gate have been specified as important cultural properties of Japan. Despite being restored in 1984, the building retains many of its original features, including the impressive chandelier which can be seen below.

Despite no longer being able to see Lake Inawashiro from the windows of Tenkyokaku, the luxurious renaissance-style architecture and liberal use of all things gold and glittery means that visitors will by all means feel that its name still rings true.

For only 520 yen, you can dress up in a traditional outfit and take as many photos as you would like in the building!

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.tif.ne.jp/tenkyokaku/en/index.html
Contact

Tenkyokaku

(+81) 242-65-2811

tenkyokaku@bloom.ocn.ne.jp

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

May - Oct.: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM | Nov. - Apr.: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Open everyday

ParkingAvailable (Space for 43 cars and 9 buses)
Related infoEntrance Fee
Adults: 360 yen
High school students: 210 yen
Junior high and elementary school students: 100 yen
Discount rate available for groups.

Traditional Dress-up Experience
Individual: 520 yen
At present, this opportunity is limited to women only. There are also outfits for younger visitors.
Access Details
AccessGodenyama 1048-14 , Okinasawa, Inawashiro Town, Yama District, Fukushima Pref. 969-3285
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min drive from Inawashiro-Bandaikogen I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: Get off at Inawashiro Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line). Take a bus from outside Inawashiro Station for 15 min and get off at Nagahama bus stop. From there, Tenkyokaku is a 5 min walk

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