Nicchu Line Weeping Cherry Blossom

Nicchu Line Weeping Cherry Blossom

The tracks of the now-closed Nicchu Railway Line have been restored as a cycling and walking path, from which you can view 1,000 weeping cherry blossom trees along a 3 km stretch. A steam train is also displayed near the Kitakata Plaza.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.kitakata-kanko.jp/category/detail.php?id=104(Japanese)
Contact

Kitakata Tourism and Product Association

(+81) 241-24-5200

Best Season
  • Spring
ParkingPaid parking
Entrance FeeFree
Related infoBest time to see cherry blossoms: Mid to Late April
Access Details
Access7244-2 Oshimizuhigashi, Kitakata City, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 35 min drive from the Aizuwakamatsu I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway.

By Train: 5 min walk from Kitakata Station on the JR Ban-etsu West Line

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Yamatogawa Sake Brewery

Close to Kitakata station is Yamatogawa Brewery. This brewery was built in 1790 in the Edo Era, and has been producing sake ever since. The famous sake cultivated at this brewery is made using the clear, mountain water from Mt Iide. Another important component of Yamatogawa Brewery’s sake is the use of high-quality, carefully cultivated rice. This rice is grown in Yamatogawa Brewery’s own rice fields, and from the fields of selected local farming families. Next door to the brewery is the Northern Museum – where old earthen storehouses built during the Edo Era have been opened up to the public. Here you can learn about how the sake-making process has changed since the Edo period. Tours and sake tasting available for free.

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Sazaedo Temple

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The Warehouses of Kitakata

In the Meiji and Taisho eras, Kitakata City experienced a boom in the construction of kura (traditional Japanese storehouses). There are approximately 4,200 still left in the city today. While these were used both as storehouses for businesses in the brewing and lacquerware industries, the building of a kura has traditionally been considered among Kitakata locals as a great symbol of status, and a source of pride. In the Mitsuya District, the rows of brick storehouses are reminiscent of rural Europe, whereas in the Sugiyama district, they have roofs that take the appearance of helmets. Visitors can see a range of kura and other traditional buildings at Kitakata Kura-no-Sato museum, or enjoy exploring the kura of the city on foot or by bike. See here for a 1 day itinerary for visiting Kitakata City.

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