Sabo Yamadaya Café

Sabo Yamadaya Café

A lovely café deep located in Ouchi-juku, decorated with adorable items like okiagari-koboshi (traditional monk dolls) and Aizu-made decorated candles. In addition to yukimuro coffee (snow-cured coffee), they’ve put together an original menu full of locally produced drinks and sweets. Feel free to leisurely enjoy a coffee in Ouchi-juku.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://ouchijyuku.com/(Japanese)
Contact

Sabo Yamadaya Café

Best Season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Autumn
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM (Last Order at 4:00 PM)

Closed: Irregular holidays (Open during Golden Week)

Access Details
AccessYamamoto, Ouchi, Shimogo Town, Minamiaizu District, Fukushima Pref. 969-5207
View directions
Getting there

Along the main Ouchi-juku street, on the right-hand side. See this page for more.

Related trips

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Yunokami Onsen Station

Yunokami Onsen Station is one of only 2 train stations with a thatched roof in Japan. The station is known for its great location as a cherry blossom viewing spot with a unique atmosphere. There is an irori (sunken fireplace) where tourists can warm themselves up in winter, and a foot bath sourced from natural hot spring water just next to the station. Yunokami Onsen town is a popular place to stay the night for those visiting destinations such as Ouchi-juku and To-no-hetsuri are located in the same area.

The World Glassware Hall
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Ouchi-juku

<p>Take a journey to the past in Fukushima Prefecture&rsquo;s Ouchi-juku area. This isolated village boasts thatched-roof houses and natural streets making you feel at one with the people who lived here hundreds of years ago.</p><p>Nestled in the southwestern mountains of Fukushima, Ouchi-juku is a great spot to visit thanks to its unique charm and history. This village was established under the post station system of the Edo period, and played a vital role as a rest stop for travelers.</p><p>In 1981, the well-preserved streets of Ouchi-juku led to it being designated as an Important Preservation District for a Group of Traditional Buildings. It isn&rsquo;t difficult to see why&mdash;the village looks as it did during its heyday. And with no telephone or electric wires above ground, the view from the top of the hill overlooking the village is marvelous.</p><p>It is a picturesque village where you can lose yourself to the flow of time. The traveler&rsquo;s road that used to run through this village was called the Shimotsuke Kaido Route, or the Aizu Nishi Kaido Route.</p><p>Ouchi-juku not only connected Aizu to Nikko, it also connected Aizu-Wakamatsu to Imaichi, a post town on the Nikko Kaido Route in Tochigi Prefecture. This road was frequented by many travelers as well as by the processions of feudal lords who had to travel to and from Edo periodically.</p><p>Travelers of the Edo Period rested at the inns of Ouchi-juku to relieve their fatigue. Nowadays, festivals and events help draw in new visitors. The annual <a href="http://fukushima.travel/destination/ouchi-juku-snow-festival/204">Snow Festival</a> in February turns Ouchi-juku into a pretty candlelit scene.</p><p>Visit in July to see a procession of dancers dressed in traditional Edo Period costumes, and you might even get to wear a <em>happi </em>(festival attire jacket) and join the locals in their celebrations!</p><p>And when you&rsquo;re feeling hungry be sure to try some of the local specialties, which include <em>negi soba</em> (fresh buckwheat noodles eaten using a green onion), stick-roasted char fish, and more.</p><p>There&rsquo;s a little bit of everything at Ouchi-juku.</p>

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