Sabo Yamadaya Café

Sabo Yamadaya Café

A lovely café deep located in Ouchi-juku, decorated with adorable items like okiagari-koboshi (traditional monk dolls) and Aizu-made decorated candles. In addition to yukimuro coffee (snow-cured coffee), they’ve put together an original menu full of locally produced drinks and sweets. Feel free to leisurely enjoy a coffee in Ouchi-juku.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://ouchijyuku.com/(Japanese)
Contact

Sabo Yamadaya Café

Best Season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Autumn
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM (Last Order at 4:00 PM)

Closed: Irregular holidays (Open during Golden Week)

Access Details
AccessYamamoto, Ouchi, Shimogo Town, Minamiaizu District, Fukushima Pref. 969-5207
View directions
Getting there

Along the main Ouchi-juku street, on the right-hand side. See this page for more.

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