Kaiseizan Park’s Cherry Blossoms

Kaiseizan Park’s Cherry Blossoms

Koriyama City’s Kaiseizan Park is home to around 1300 cherry trees, making it one of the prefecture’s most prominent cherry blossom spots. The impressive trees are lit up in the evening during cherry blossom season, making for fantastic views. That being said, whether day or night, this spot is popular amongst visitors coming to view cherry blossoms.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.kanko-koriyama.gr.jp/tourism/detail2-1-349.html(Automated translation available)
Contact

Koriyama City Tourism Association

(+81) 24-924-2621

Best Season
  • Spring
Entrance FeeFree
Related infoBest season: Early to late April
Access Details
AccessKaisei 1-5, Koriyama City, Fukushima Pref. 963-8851
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min drive from Koriyama I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

By Taxi: 10 min by taxi from Koriyama Station (JR Tohoku Main Line)

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Miharu Takizakura

Miharu is a small town in central Fukushima Prefecture. The town’s name means “three springs” and it is easy to see how it got such a name. With cherry, plum, and peach trees blossoming in spectacular displays every spring, it is almost as if spring has tripled! But the most famous of the trees in Miharu is the Miharu Takizakura tree, which is a nationally recognized Natural Monument. Over ten centuries old, the beautiful Miharu Takizakura is a flowering cherry tree that spreads out in all directions and makes for a breathtaking vista. The cascading blankets of blossoms are how this tree got the name takizakura, or “waterfall cherry tree.” It is even one of the “three great cherry trees” of Japan (along with Usuzumizakura in Gifu and the Jindaizakura in Yamanashi Prefecture). Miharu Takizakura sits in a sakura hollow in order to protect it from the elements while providing excellent drainage. The heavy boughs of the tree are supported by wooden beams and lend to its elegant form. The Miharu Takizakura begins blooming from mid-April. During the day the sight is whimsical, but visit in the evening and you’ll be treated to an almost haunting beauty as the tree is illuminated. Aside from this huge cherry tree (over 12 meters tall and 18 to 22 meters in spread), the area is also blessed with various wildflowers, including cherry and rapeseed flowers. But, of course, the Miharu Takizakura is what the annual 200,000 visitors are there to see. The view from the base of the sakura is considered to be the most beautiful and the Miharu Takizakura often ranks as the best sakura tree in all of Japan.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Kashi-Ohashi Bridge

<p>Nishigo Village is truly blessed with breathtaking scenery and view spots, such as Kashi-Ohashi Bridge. Kashi-Ohashi Bridge stretches for 199 m against a backdrop of mountains, colored with fresh spring greenery or bright red leaves, depending on the season. Home to the water source of the Abukuma River, and filled with primeval forest trees, the beauty of Nishigo Village area was even praised by the feudal lord Matsudaira Sadanobu in centuries gone by. A bridle path has been constructed near Kashi-Ohashi Bridge, and lots of hikers come to visit every summer and autumn.</p>

The World Glassware Hall
Shopping & Souvenirs

Fukushima Prefecture Souvenir Shop

Fukushima Prefecture Souvenir Shop (also known as the ‘Bussankan’) is a short walk from the west exit of Fukushima Station. Enjoy a delicious lunch, and even do a sake tasting, at the Fukushima Lounge. All food and sake has been grown and produced locally in Fukushima – a prefecture which is blessed with a wealth of natural beauty. Browse locally-made items – which have been designed over generations in response to Fukushima’s rich history and culture, and have become representative of various areas of Fukushima Prefecture – displayed and sold in the ‘Local Products’ section. Great food, dried goods, local products and traditional crafts – the best from all over the prefecture can all be found at Fukushima Prefecture Souvenir Shop. As well as displaying and selling delicious local produce and locally-made folk crafts from a wide-range of areas across the prefecture, Fukushima Prefecture Souvenir Shop also provides information on local products and sightseeing opportunities in Fukushima. Local artisans, farmers and performers also regularly visit the shop to display and sell their work, so definitely make sure to visit.

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Koriyama Nunobiki Kaze-no-Kogen (Koriyama Nunobiki Wind Farm)
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Koriyama Nunobiki Kaze-no-Kogen (Koriyama Nunobiki Wind Farm)

These windy highlands are located at the plateau summit of Mt. Aizu-Nunobiki. It’s location to the south of Lake Inawashiro provides ample breeze to power the 33 windmills that stand majestically atop the highland plateau. Nunobiki Kogen Wind Farm is one of Japan's largest wind farms. It's location at an altitude of about 1,000 meters, makes for a truly fantastic view of the surrounding scenery. From early August to early September, visitors can enjoy amazing vistas of the beautiful himawari batake (sunflower fields). The sunflowers here are planted at 3 different intervals, meaning that visitors can enjoy seeing them throughout the summer months. Sunflowers aren’t all that Koriyama Nunobiki Kaze-no-Kogen has to offer flower lovers: May brings rapeseed blossoms into full bloom, and later - from August to September - you can see cosmos blooming. Of course, visitors are always greeted with superb views of Lake Inawashiro and Mt. Bandai. There are walking courses along the plateau, so visitors can explore the area and snap some great photos. One really amazing photo spot can be found at the observatory. Depending on the timing of your visit, you might be able to purchase some local vegetables at temporary stalls. We recommend trying the region’s famous Nunobiki Plateau daikon radish.  

Kassenba's Weeping Cherry Tree
Nature & Scenery

Kassenba's Weeping Cherry Tree

These two weeping cherry trees are said to be the grandchildren of the great Miharu Takizakura weeping cherry tree in nearby Miharu Town. They bloom with fantastic pink flowers. When they are in full bloom, the trees are if a waterfall of blossoms is cascading from their branches. These trees are estimated to be around 170 years old. We recommend taking photographs from the bottom of the slope, so you can capture the pink of the blossoms, together with the blue of the sky, and yellow of the canola flowers.

Miharu Takizakura
Nature & Scenery

Miharu Takizakura

Miharu is a small town in central Fukushima Prefecture. The town’s name means “three springs” and it is easy to see how it got such a name. With cherry, plum, and peach trees blossoming in spectacular displays every spring, it is almost as if spring has tripled! But the most famous of the trees in Miharu is the Miharu Takizakura tree, which is a nationally recognized Natural Monument. Over ten centuries old, the beautiful Miharu Takizakura is a flowering cherry tree that spreads out in all directions and makes for a breathtaking vista. The cascading blankets of blossoms are how this tree got the name takizakura, or “waterfall cherry tree.” It is even one of the “three great cherry trees” of Japan (along with Usuzumizakura in Gifu and the Jindaizakura in Yamanashi Prefecture). Miharu Takizakura sits in a sakura hollow in order to protect it from the elements while providing excellent drainage. The heavy boughs of the tree are supported by wooden beams and lend to its elegant form. The Miharu Takizakura begins blooming from mid-April. During the day the sight is whimsical, but visit in the evening and you’ll be treated to an almost haunting beauty as the tree is illuminated. Aside from this huge cherry tree (over 12 meters tall and 18 to 22 meters in spread), the area is also blessed with various wildflowers, including cherry and rapeseed flowers. But, of course, the Miharu Takizakura is what the annual 200,000 visitors are there to see. The view from the base of the sakura is considered to be the most beautiful and the Miharu Takizakura often ranks as the best sakura tree in all of Japan.

Nanko Park
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Nanko Park

In 1801, Matsudaira Sadanobu, the twelfth Lord of Shirakawa, constructed a recreational area which was to be opened to anybody - regardless of status or family background. This recreational area turned into Nanko Park, which is considered to be the Japan's oldest public park. There are Yoshino cherry blossoms (about 800 trees), azaleas, pine trees, and maple trees at the edge of lake. You can enjoy seasonal scenery such as cherry blossoms in spring, fresh green leaves in early summer, autumn colors, and winter scenery with the beautiful contrast of the Nasu Mountains. The park contains Nanko Shrine, where Sadanobu is enshrined as a deity. Next to Nanko Shrine stands the beautiful Japanese gardens Suirakuen. At Suirakuen, visitors can try traditional Japanese tea served in a tea room, which boasts a spectacular view of the gardens. There are a number of shops, cafés, and restaurants along the edge of Lake Nanko. One of the local specialities to look out for is nanko dango, which are sticky rice balls on a skewer, served with different toppings.

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