No. 1 Tadami Bridge View Spot

No. 1 Tadami Bridge View Spot

A panoramic view of the arch bridge stretches over Tadami River. On clear winter days, the bridge is reflected in the river, surrounded by deep, glistening snow. Spring's fresh leaves, summer's lush greenery, autumn's red leaves… the view changes with each season.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.okuaizu.net/en/tadami-line/
Contact

Mishima Town Tourism Association

(+81) 241-48-5000

mishima@oboe.ocn.ne.jp

Best SeasonAll Year
ParkingParking available at the Michi-no-Eki Ozekaido Mishima-juku
Entrance FeeFree to visit
Access Details
AccessKawai, Mishima, Onuma District, Fukushima Prefecture 969-7515
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 20 min drive from the Aizu-bange I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway.

By Public Transport: 10 min walk from Michi-no-Eki Ozekaido Mishima-juku, which can be reached via bus or taxi from Aizu Miyashita Station.

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