Tadami River Bridge No. 1 Viewpoint

Tadami River Bridge No. 1 Viewpoint

A panoramic view of the arch bridge stretches over the Tadami River. On clear winter days, the bridge is reflected in the river, surrounded by deep, glistening snow. Spring's fresh leaves, summer's lush greenery, autumn's red leaves... the view changes each season.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://tadami-line.jp/
Contact

Mishima Town Tourism Association

(+81) 241-48-5000

Best SeasonAll Year
ParkingParking available at the Michi-no-Eki Ozekaido Mishima-juku
Entrance FeeFree to visit
Access Details
AccessKawai, Mishima, Onuma District, Fukushima Prefecture 969-7515
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 20 min drive from the Aizu-bange I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway.

By Public Transport: 10 min walk from Michi-no-Eki Ozekaido Mishima-juku, which can be reached via bus or taxi from Aizu Miyashita Station.

Useful Links

Guide to Visiting the Famous Tadami River Bridge Viewpoint

Tadami Line: 5 Sights You Shouldn't Miss

Michi-no-Eki Ozekaido Mishima-juku (Roadside Station)

5 Reasons to Visit Mishima Town

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