Things to do in Fukushima

Find a wealth of things to see and do in Fukushima Prefecture, from beautiful natural environments or cultural and historical discoveries to regional flavors, crafts, and festivals.

Unique in Fukushima

Lake Inawashiro
Nature & Scenery

Lake Inawashiro

Japan's fourth-largest freshwater lake, Lake Inawashiro is situated in Bandai Asahi National Park. It is also known as the “Heavenly Mirror Lake” and has a surface area of 104 square kilometers! The combination of Lake Inawashiro and Mt. Bandai form one of Aizu's representative landscapes. And being less than three hours from Tokyo by shinkansen and local train means that you have easy access from a major transport hub. The lake offers year-round fun. Enjoy cherry blossoms in spring at Iwahashi Shrine, one of Aizu’s five famous cherry trees. Summer at Lake Inawashiro is slightly cooler than the rest of Fukushima, so take advantage of camping by the lakeshore, and a wide variety of marine sports. Colored leaves and hikes are the popular thing to do in autumn, view the fiery hues and take in the crisp air. In winter, visitors can enjoy fresh powder snow and winter thrills in the form of skiing and snowboarding; and you can even catch a glimpse of migrating swans on the shores. It’s truly a beauty no matter when you decide to visit. There are also a wide range of scenic spots from where visitors can take photographs and soak in the view. It’s a great place to escape from the stress of work and life or just to experience Japanese nature and landscapes. Lake Inawashiro's size means that it is accessible from a number of sightseeing spot, including Tenkyokaku stately house and Hideo Noguchi Memorial Museum (a museum dedicated to the life and work of a Japanese scientist famous for his research on yellow fever). There’s plenty more to do nearby: view some amazing works by international artists at the Morohashi Museum of Modern Art, or visit the rainbow-colored Goshiki-numa Ponds.

Tsurugajo Castle
Historical Sites

Tsurugajo Castle

Tsurugajo Castle allows visitors the opportunity to experience history, nature, and tradition with all five senses. Despite being mostly reconstructed, the surrounding park's stone walls remain in their original state. In 2010, for the first time since it was refurbished in 1965, the castle underwent a cosmetic restoration. Following completion in 2011, the same red-tile roofs seen by the Byakkotai (during the Boshin War and finals days of the Tokugawa shogunate) are now displayed for all to see. This castle is one of the final strongholds of samurai that remained loyal to the shogunate and today stands as a symbol of courage and faithfulness. Within the castle tower's museum, the swords and armor of the castle’s successive lords are on display. Visitors can watch a CG-enhanced theatrical video reflecting on the great history of Aizu. In addition to the historical atmosphere surrounding Tsurugajo, visitors can sense the changes that have occurred throughout history, thanks to the engaging and informative museum within the castle walls. It’s fun to gaze across Aizu from the fifth floor, like a feudal lord admiring his domain—the viewing platform up here provides panoramic views taking in Mt. Bandai and Mt. Iimoriyama. The castle is also a must-see in the springtime when approximately 1,000 cherry trees offer a magnificent display within the castle's grounds. When you’re in the mood for a rest, visit the Rinkaku Tea Rooms for some freshly-prepared matcha green tea. This tea house on the grounds of Tsurugajo was vital in the spread of this traditional art—and had it been destroyed during the Meiji Restoration, tea ceremony as it is known in Japan might have vanished. Tsurugajo Castle is truly a place where the modern visitor can slip into the past and become immersed in history.

Goshiki-numa Ponds
Nature & Scenery

Goshiki-numa Ponds

The Goshiki-numa ponds of Urabandai are a cluster of five volcanic lakes at the foot of Mt. Bandai. When Mt. Bandai erupted in 1888, Goshiki-numa - which translates as "Five-Colored Ponds - were formed. In actuality dozens of lakes were created due to the 1888 eruption, but the Goshiki-numa Ponds are the most famous. It was thanks to the eruption that the lakes each took on rich color; the various minerals found in each lake give them a unique color and create a mystical aura. The colors of the Goshiki-numa Ponds also change throughout the year depending on weather and time of day, a truly mysterious phenomenon. The lakes have become a popular tourist destination. The five main lakes are Bishamon, Aka, Ao, Benten, and Midoro, and their colors range from a lime green to deep turquoise to a topaz blue. A scenic walking route guides visitors around the ponds. At 3.6 km in length, this walking route - which will take you past many of the ethereal colors - takes about 70 minutes to complete. If you’d like a view of all five lakes at once, why not take the 4 km walking trail from Bishamon-numa (largest of the five lakes) up to nearby Lake Hibara. Alternatively, if hiking is not on your itinerary, enjoy a simple rowboat out on Bishamon-numa. It’s especially lovely in autumn as the color of the autumn leaves reflects on the deep green surface of the lake. In winter, there are even snowshoe trekking tours offered. The color of the lakes looks particularly vivid in winter, seeing as the minerals in some of the lakes stop them from freezing over, meaning you can see their colors contrasted with the white of the snow. Be sure to stop by the Urabandai Visitor Center, which is a large and well-equipped facility. You can find great information here about tours as well as the various geography, wildlife, and even the history of the area. It’s a great chance to learn more about the ecosystem that makes up the Goshiki-numa Ponds.

Nature & Scenery

Nanko Park
Nature & Scenery

Nanko Park

In 1801, Matsudaira Sadanobu, the twelfth Lord of Shirakawa, constructed a recreational area which was to be opened to anybody - regardless of status or family background. This recreational area turned into Nanko Park, which is considered to be the Japan's oldest public park. There are Yoshino cherry blossoms (about 800 trees), azaleas, pine trees, and maple trees at the edge of lake. You can enjoy seasonal scenery such as cherry blossoms in spring, fresh green leaves in early summer, autumn colors, and winter scenery with the beautiful contrast of the Nasu Mountains. The park contains Nanko Shrine, where Sadanobu is enshrined as a deity. Next to Nanko Shrine stands the beautiful Japanese gardens Suirakuen. At Suirakuen, visitors can try traditional Japanese tea served in a tea room, which boasts a spectacular view of the gardens. There are a number of shops, cafés, and restaurants along the edge of Lake Nanko. One of the local specialities to look out for is nanko dango, which are sticky rice balls on a skewer, served with different toppings.

Bandai-Azuma Skyline
Nature & Scenery

Bandai-Azuma Skyline

This sightseeing road that runs from Fukushima City's Takayu Onsen to the Tsuchiyu Pass, commanding panoramic views of the surrounding landscape. The spectacular views that stretch out at an average altitude of 1,350 meters attract visitors time and time again, and Bandai-Azuma Skyline has been selected as one of the 100 Best Roads in Japan. In spring, tourists can enjoy flower viewing while at the same time taking in the otherworldly winter scenery of the "Snow Corridor". In summer, the Nemoto Shakunage (Rhododendron brachycarpum), a species of alpine rose, and other alpine plants display their colorful flowers and fresh, brilliant green leaves. During autumn, the drive warms as roads become enclosed by fiery seasonal leaves. There are also many hot springs in the vicinity of the Skyline where visitors can enjoy a bath and relax stiff muscles while out on a daytrip. The roadway passes next to the crater of Mt. Azuma-Kofuji. Visitors can easily park their car at the nearby guest center and enjoy a short hike up to the crater’s rim. The Bandai-Azuma Skyline Roadway has been selected as one of the top 100 roads in Japan, and unlike many others, this one is free to use. There are rest stops along the way for the hungry traveler; the most popular is Jododaira, as it’s home to a rest house and an observatory. Be sure to plan ahead though, from mid-November to early April the roadway is closed due to heavy winter snowfall.

Historical Sites

Bentenjima Shrine
Historical Sites

Bentenjima Shrine

In a crescent shaped cove separated from the mainland on the small island known as Bentenjima Island, you will find the mysterious Bentenjima Shrine. The vermillion painted tori gate stands out against the jagged stone and the powerful waves. It is believed that the shrine was land based until an earthquake that occurred in 1410 resulted in the formation of this jagged rock island. The construction date of the original shrine is unknown. The island is also known as Wanigafuchi because, according to legend, a creature known as a “wanizame” (crocodile shark) lived on the island. Half crocodile, half shark, this creature can be seen in many old Japanese paintings. The creature may have been believed to cause the swirling water and violent waves that crashed against the rocks, sometimes resulting in people getting swept into the water. Another legend suggests that the wanizame once kidnapped a young woman from Iwaki who had wandered out to explore the island. This coast is lined with small round pebbles that shine when the water hits them. However, do not take any of these pebbles home, legend says that anyone who takes pebbles home from this coast will suffer from eye disease. This area was once a very popular destination for tourists and I highly recommend checking out the photos on the Iwaki city website linked below. It is all in Japanese, but you can read it with the google translate extension on google chrome browsers.

Maezawa L-shaped Farmhouses
Historical Sites

Maezawa L-shaped Farmhouses

The deep snows of the Aizu region meant that, in the past, cut off from other areas for months at a time, its residents had to use all their wits just to make it through the winters. These L-shaped farmhouses known as "magariya" conceal a number of the innovations developed by this local people. As you can see in the layout of the house, the long earth floor stretches out towards the road. Long ago, horses were indispensable in farming, but the deep snow of winter meant that keeping them tied up in external stables was cruel. Therefore, stables were built into the house, meaning that the unfloored working area inevitably became larger. Having this area far from the road made getting to the road through the snow more difficult, as up to a meter can fall overnight. Accordingly, with the aim of reducing work, locating this working area as close as feasible to the road ended up with the house being laid out in an L-shape. Many of these houses were built in Maezawa and throughout Tateiwa Village, as a way of living with horses in the deep snows of the Aizu region. The houses have become more and more comfortable over time, with the "magariya" design lasting until the present day. While this magariya-style farmhouse used to be built everywhere that saw heavy snow, they are gradually disappearing. Accordingly, the Maezawa magariya have been designated as historical cultural assets. In 1985, the village began actively preserving these houses, and this area now attracts many visitors. One of the magariya buildings have been repurposed into a museum in the village where visitors can learn about life in Maezawa.

Shingu Kumano Shrine Nagatoko
Historical Sites

Shingu Kumano Shrine Nagatoko

Built in 1055, the Nagatoko is Shingu Kumano Shrine's worship hall and translates to “long floor”. It is designated as a Nationally Important Cultural Asset. Built as the main structure during the Heian period to the Kamakura period, its thatched roof is supported by 44 massive pillars, each one 45 cm in diameter. This comprises a single large, open stage with no walls, and is said to have been used for ascetic training by priests, as well as kagura dance festivals. Housed inside a nearby large wooden frame is the shrine bell, which visitors to the shrine are welcome to hit with the wooden rod. There is also a famous copper pot where, allegedly, rice was rinsed before being offered to the gods; it was designated as an Important Cultural Property in 1959. This treasure is housed at the shrine along with many others and are on display for visitors along with national and prefectural designated cultural assets. Also not to be missed in the lion statue in the center of the treasure hall. It is known as a guardian of wisdom and there is a local legend that says if you can pass under the belly of the lion your own wisdom will blossom. It’s a popular place for students to visit before the exam season, and even politicians before election season. Come autumn, the magnificent 800-year-old ginkgo tree is bathed in yellow and makes a beautiful contrast with the Nagatoko. This ancient tree has also been designated as a Natural Monument of Kitakata City. in November of every year, you can even see a special illumination of the ginkgo tree for a limited time.

Hot Springs

Iwaki Yumoto Onsen
Hot Springs

Iwaki Yumoto Onsen

This well-known hot spring is thought to be one of the oldest hot springs in Japan. The list of most ancient springs also includes Dogo Onsen (Ehime Prefecture) and Arima Onsen (Hyogo Prefecture). It is said that Iwaki Yumoto Onsen as first used for its hot spring water around one thousand years ago. Water is pumped into the numerous hotels and ryokan in the town at a rate of five tons per minute. The springs have various benefits such as having skin-beautifying properties.

Iizaka Onsen
Hot Springs

Iizaka Onsen

Fukushima City's Iizaka Onsen has been used as an onsen town for over 1,000 years, and has been visited by legendary figures in Japanese literature such as Matsuo Basho (1644-1694), the master of haiku poems. Locals in Iizaka Onsen pride themselves on the well-known Japanese phrase “Beppu in the West; Iizaka in the East”, which refers to the best onsen towns in Japan. The Surikami River that passes through the town is lined on either side by 9 high-rise ryokan (Japanese-style inns). More ryokan can be found scattered about Iizaka Onsen. The town is also dotted with a number of communal baths and public foot baths. Some of Iizaka Onsen’s most well-loved local foods include include Enban Gyoza and soft-boiled eggs known as Onsen Tamago. Iizaka Onsen is also close to sightseeing spots such as Hanamomo no Sato, the Fruit Line, and Nakano Fudoson Temple.

Outdoor Activities

Snow Monsters at Mt. Nishi-Azuma
Outdoor Activities

Snow Monsters at Mt. Nishi-Azuma

Mt. Nishi-Azuma is a 2035m tall mountain that can be accessed from Fukushima Prefecture’s Kitashiobara Village. During the coldest points of winter, it is possible to find frozen “snow monsters” up on the mountain. Of course the snow monsters are not really monsters, these are trees that have endured blizzards and collected snow until they became covered with a thick frost! From the Grandeco Snow Resort’s Gondola Station, you transfer to a ski lift, and from there it is 3 hours on foot to reach this viewpoint. Especially in the snow, the mountains can be difficult to navigate, so you must climb together with a guide in winter. If you are interested in visiting here, please contact us!

Ashinomaki Snow Park
Outdoor Activities

Ashinomaki Snow Park

Looking for a fun place to enjoy the snow with the whole family? Ashinomaki Snow Park is a great place to enjoy the fluffy Fukushima snow. The snow park is set in a picturesque field that is bordered by a lovely forest and river. Activities such as snowmobile driving, banana boat riding, tubing, snowball fights are all possible here! You can even hang out in Japanese igloos or “kamakura” and roast mochi over a fire. Riding in banana boats and being pulled in snow boats are especially popular activities at the snow park. The snow park is also a popular destination for snowy photoshoots! If you want to visit on a weekday, reservations must be made by 5:00 p.m. the day before. For weekend visitors no reservation is required. Dates of operation are dependent on snow fall, for the 2022 season the dates of operation at January 20 – February 28.

Jododaira Visitor Center
Outdoor Activities

Jododaira Visitor Center

Jododaira Visitor Center, located at an altitude of 1500 m, stands partway along the Bandai-Azuma Skyline sightseeing road. Jododaira acts as a base to spend the day hiking nearby mountain routes, including Mt. Higashi-Azuma (1,975 m) and Mt. Issaikyo (1,949 m). For those who don’t fancy a long hike, the 1-hour round trip walk up and around the crater at Mt. Azuma Kofuji (1,705 m) is perfect, as it is a very short walk from Jododaira Visitor Center. The Azuma mountains are all totally unique, and are great places to enjoy local flora and fauna. If hiking in this area, please be mindful that the altitude reaches close to 2000 m, so make sure to take equipment necessary in the event of a sudden weather change. The Jododaira area is also prone to high volcanic gas levels, so it is a good idea to check whether the area is open to visitors before making the drive up the mountain roads.

Cultural Experiences

Kimono Experience in Aizu-Wakamatsu City
Cultural Experiences

Kimono Experience in Aizu-Wakamatsu City

You can now try on yukata or kimono at Tsuruga Kimono Rental Shop, which opened in April 2019. Tsuruga Kimono Rental Shop is located on the second floor of Tsurugajo Kaikan, which is right next to Tsurugajo Castle in Aizu-Wakamatsu City. Rent a kimono or yukata and take photos with friends and family in front of the castle, or venture a bit further to the historical Nanokamachi-dori Street to feel like you have stepped back in time. Come and make some great memories in Aizu-Wakamatsu City!

Hot in Yanaizu
Cultural Experiences

Hot in Yanaizu

Yanaizu Town is best known as the birthplace of the legend of the lucky red cow Akabeko, but it is also known for its famous manju (sweet steamed buns). Hot in Yanaizu is a center with a bit of everything; it sells local products, has sightseeing information, rest areas, and an eatery. They even have an "experience area". It goes without saying that, at Hot in Yanaizu, you can paint your own Akabeko, but you can also make manju with the help of the facilities' kind staff (Read more here). Hot in Yanaizu have staff that can speak English, but please make sure to contact them in advance, as you might not be able to do the experience without placing a booking. Please take your time & enjoy the slow pace of Japanese countryside life in Yanaizu Town.

Local Foods

Tamakiya Bakery
Local Foods

Tamakiya Bakery

<p style="text-align:justify">A wonderful family owned and operated small business that sell unique ultraman and kaijyu stylized bread and cookies.</p><p style="text-align:justify">The interior is decorated with Ultraman related memorabilia. This is a family owned and operated small business, and the creativity of the (now adult) kids of the family shines through in the various Ultraman and Kaijyu related breads and cookies!</p><p style="text-align:justify">Each one is absolutely delicious.</p><p style="text-align:justify">&copy;円谷プロ</p>

Arts & Crafts

Sukagawa Enobori Yoshinoya Workshop
Arts & Crafts

Sukagawa Enobori Yoshinoya Workshop

<p style="text-align:justify">Established in 1836, the Yoshinoya family has been continuing the production of Enobori banners using traditional techniques. Originally the family business was a kimono shop, however, the side business of painting Enobori banners began to grow until is eventually became their main business.</p><p style="text-align:justify">These banners typically feature images of warriors and can be quite complex with their designs. They are made by painting on banners with a type of calligraphy ink.</p><p style="text-align:justify">To create clean and uniform design, stencils are made from various materials to be used as a guide for the design. Once the basic design is painted with a stencil, you connect the lines and add fine details by hand.</p><p style="text-align:justify">As a nod to a famous Sukagawa person, they began creating a design of Ultraman posing as a samurai warrior! You can try out the traditional banner making method explained above to create tote bags and small banners featuring a variety of samurai and Ultraman samurai designs.</p><p style="text-align:justify">&copy;円谷プロ</p>

The World Glassware Hall
Arts & Crafts

The World Glassware Hall

The World Glassware Hall is located at the foot of Mt. Bandai, by the side of Lake Inawashiro. About 25,000 handmade glassware items, imported directly from countries all over the world, are exhibited and sold at the World Glassware Hall the museum. You can even try your hand at glass etching, or glass blowing. Next to the Glassware Hall is a local beer brewery and a sweets shop. Local Inawashiro beer has received the gold prize in an international beer competition, and can be purchased on site. In the sweets shop, you can try a line up of famous local delicacies.

Design Your Own Shirakawa Daruma
Arts & Crafts

Design Your Own Shirakawa Daruma

There are records of Shirakawa Daruma (Japanese traditional dolls) being sold as far back as the feudal reign of the Niwa Domain in 1627. Current Shirakawa Daruma are known as “Shirakawa Tsurugame Shochikubai Daruma.” The faces of these dolls are painted to incorporate various animals and plants, with the eyebrows representing cranes, the mustache representing a turtle, the ears representing pines and plum trees, and the beard representing bamboo or pine trees. All of these images are thought to bring good luck. The daruma is known to be a very classical, lucky talisman, started by Matsudaira Sadanobu, the lord of Shirakawa, when he hired the renowned painter Tani Buncho to paint the now famous face on the daruma doll. Once every year a large Shirakawa Daruma Market is held to celebrate and sell the beloved daruma dolls. You can paint your own daruma at the two daruma workshops in town!

Makie Painting Lacquerware Experience at Suzuzen
Arts & Crafts

Makie Painting Lacquerware Experience at Suzuzen

Suzuzen was established in 1833 as a lacquerware wholesale shop. Not only can visitors see process of lacquerware being finished using gold and silver dusted designs called 'Makie', but visitors can also have the opportunity to design their own lacquered product using Makie design techniques, which is perfect to take home as a souvenir. Suzuzen is made up of 6 kura (Japanese-style warehouses), which have been renovated. The Suzuzen warehouses include a gallery featuring pieces by contemporary artists who use lacquer in their work, and a cafe which is open for lunch. English-language signs also make the history of lacquer in Aizu accessible for overseas visitors.

Museums & Galleries

Sukagawa Tokusatsu Archive Center
Museums & Galleries

Sukagawa Tokusatsu Archive Center

<p style="text-align:justify">The Archive Center was opened on November 3rd, 2020 in order to share the unique artistry of Tokusatsu (Japanese special effects) with the world. Early Tokusatsu creator and Sukagawa Native, Eiji Tsuburaya came to be known as the &ldquo;Father of Tokusatsu&rdquo; due to his incredible Tokusatsu special effects in films such as Godzilla (1954) and television series such as the Ultra-series.</p><p style="text-align:justify">Prior to the development of advanced digital and cgi special effects, science fiction films heavily relied on Tokusatsu techniques to create captivating live-action scenes where enormous monsters or Kaijyu wreak havoc upon cities. Smashing and exploding miniature models of cities allowed film makers to create incredible scenes for films and television.</p><p style="text-align:justify">The Archine Center stores and displays many historic pieces that were used in or otherwise are related to the production of Tokusatsu films. There is even a special where visitors can watch Tokusatsu artists in action!</p><p style="text-align:left"><span style="color:black">&copy;</span><span style="color:black">円谷プロ</span></p>

Eiji Tsuburaya Museum
Museums & Galleries

Eiji Tsuburaya Museum

<p style="text-align:justify">This is a museum dedicated to Eiji Tsuburaya the &ldquo;Father of Tokusatsu,&rdquo; or, the &ldquo;Father of Japanese special effects.&rdquo; There are exhibits relating to many of the monsters, &ldquo;Kaijyu,&rdquo; that are featured in many of Tsuburaya&rsquo;s films including a Godzilla suit and Mothera egg!</p><p style="text-align:justify">Eiji Tsuburaya is from Sukagawa City so you will also find statues around town of various Kaijyu and Ultraman characters from the Ultra-series, a series that was primarily created by Tsuburaya.</p><p style="text-align:justify">&copy;円谷プロ</p>

Hideo Noguchi Memorial Museum
Museums & Galleries

Hideo Noguchi Memorial Museum

Most people probably don’t know who Hideo Noguchi (1876-1928) is by name but just look at a 1,000-yen note and you’ll know his face. A renowned bacteriologist, Noguchi made great advances in the research of a vaccine for yellow fever. He’s also credited with the discovery of the agent which causes syphilis. This memorial museum was established to honor the Nobel-nominated bacteriologist, and to introduce his life achievements. The house where Noguchi was born stands within the museum grounds. Visitors to the house can see the fireplace where he fell as a child, leading to him seriously burning his left hand. The alcove post of the house has carved into it the words of resolution Noguchi made before he went to Tokyo. The exhibition room contains many resources that introduce Noguchi's life and accomplishments, including his favorite articles, letters, and photographs. In Noguchi's laboratory, which was recreated for the memorial museum, visitors can interact with a robot designed in the image of Noguchi. The robot answers questions from visitors and gives them encouraging messages. Though the house retains its Meiji Period charm, the hall and facilities were renovated in April 2015, during which time the experience-based corner was added. Here, guests can learn about bacteriology through videos and interactive games. Aizu-Ichiban Café, a café which renovated from the clinic where Hideo Noguchi received treatment for the burns he suffered to his left hand, is located nearby. Once named Kaihiyo Clinic, this is where he spent much of his youth and acquired his motivation to study and ambition to help others. There are also a number of his belongings on display, making it an interesting place to visit after a trip to the museum.

Fukushima Prefectural Museum of Art
Museums & Galleries

Fukushima Prefectural Museum of Art

Fukushima Prefectural Museum of Art, located at the foot of Mt. Shinobu on the north side of Fukushima City, houses over 2,000 pieces of art, including paintings, block prints, carvings, craft works, and more. Some highlights of the museum's collection include paintings by Shoji Sekine and woodblock prints by Kiyoshi Saito, both of whom were born in Fukushima Prefecture, as well as a collection of impressionist art, and 20th century paintings by artists such as Ben Shahn and Andrew Whyeth.

Shopping & Souvenirs

Namie Roadside Station
Shopping & Souvenirs

Namie Roadside Station

<p>Namie Town was once a bustling seaside town that was famous for their unique style of pottery and the large number of artisans in town. Along the coast the <a href="https://fukushima.travel/destination/the-suzuki-brewery-in-namie-town/341" target="_blank">Suzuki Brewery</a> created delicious local sake.</p><p>After the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami of 2011 and the following accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the residents of Namie Town were forced to evacuate their town. Nearly all of the buildings close to the coastline were destroyed by the enormous tsunami wave, many lives were lost. When it became clear that evacuees would not be able to return to their homes, people were deeply saddened at the devastating loss of many of the neighbors, their homes and their hometown culture. As residents settled in other areas of Fukushima and continued their lives, many believed that the rich culture of the town that had been created for generation would be lost.</p><p>However, people of Namie Town chose to fight to preserve the rich culture and traditions of their hometown. So, the Namie Roadside Station was created to do just that. Here visitors can learn about the unique style of pottery that originated in Namie Town, shop the collections of several Namie Town artisans, and even try a pottery class!</p><p>The Namie Roadside Station is also the new home of the <a href="https://fukushima.travel/destination/the-suzuki-brewery-in-namie-town/341" target="_blank">Suzuki Brewery</a> that was formerly located at the Namie Town seaside before it was destroyed by the tsunami wave. The head brewer was able to evacuate, and has been continued the same brewing methods that were developed in Namie Town</p><p>By visiting the Namie Roadside Station you can support the preservation of the culture of this unique seaside town! You can also shop the wares of many locals who were affected by the disaster but nevertheless work hard to preserve their hometown culture.</p>

Honke Kanouya
Shopping & Souvenirs

Honke Kanouya

Among the simple color palette of Ouchi-juku, Honke Kanouya will draw your eyes with their brightly-colored collection of goods. Lining the store front is a wide assortment of items like vegetable-shaped beanbags to ornaments to decorations to fabric accessories. All these crafts are handmade. The eye-catching goods make great souvenirs for family and friends alike! Recommended items include the Aizu-made fabric accessories and selected seasonal vegetables beanbags.  

Fukushima Prefecture Souvenir Shop
Shopping & Souvenirs

Fukushima Prefecture Souvenir Shop

Fukushima Prefecture Souvenir Shop (also known as the ‘Bussankan’) is a short walk from the west exit of Fukushima Station. Enjoy a delicious lunch, and even do a sake tasting, at the Fukushima Lounge. All food and sake has been grown and produced locally in Fukushima – a prefecture which is blessed with a wealth of natural beauty. Browse locally-made items – which have been designed over generations in response to Fukushima’s rich history and culture, and have become representative of various areas of Fukushima Prefecture – displayed and sold in the ‘Local Products’ section. Great food, dried goods, local products and traditional crafts – the best from all over the prefecture can all be found at Fukushima Prefecture Souvenir Shop. As well as displaying and selling delicious local produce and locally-made folk crafts from a wide-range of areas across the prefecture, Fukushima Prefecture Souvenir Shop also provides information on local products and sightseeing opportunities in Fukushima. Local artisans, farmers and performers also regularly visit the shop to display and sell their work, so definitely make sure to visit.

Tsurugajo Kaikan
Shopping & Souvenirs

Tsurugajo Kaikan

Tsurugajo Kaikan is a shopping complex next to Tsurugajo Castle. Here you can try local cuisine, from Wappa Meshi and Sauce Katsudon, to soba noodles and Kitakata Ramen. The French restaurant "Racines" is also on the premises, so that both Japanese and western-style cuisines can be enjoyed in one location. The restaurants have seating for approximately 1,000 guests. The first floor contains a tax-free shop that sells local Aizu goods and souvenirs, from ready-to-cook Kitakata Ramen, soba noodles, Japanese pickles, and sweet treats, to traditional crafts like Akabeko lucky red cow. You can even try painting your own Akabeko cow (a traditional folk toy which is said to bring luck), and take it home as a souvenir of your trip. Painting an Akabeko takes about 30 minutes, and a reservation is required for groups. The parking area accommodates full-size buses as well as personal vehicles.  

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